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  • iStock/Thinkstock(CHICAGO) -- Authorities late Wednesday night arrested a person of interest linked to the murder of a 2-year-old boy found in Chicago's Little Village neighborhood earlier that day.The suspect was apprehended in Kankakee County during a traffic stop by police and FBI agents and will be returned to Chicago for questioning, said Anthony Guglielmi, a Chicago Police Department spokesman.Police were called to an apartment building around 2 p.m. and found the toddler unresponsive when they went inside an upper residence.The boy was pronounced dead at the scene after suffering severe trauma from lacerations and stab wounds, police said.A source told ABC affiliate WLS-TV the boy may have been found in a bag.The Cook County Medical Examiner identified the victim as Mateo Garcia."It's very hard to see this kind of situation around this neighborhood. It's very hard," said Rafael Abrago, who lives nearby."To hear something like this, to come outside and see all the cars, and the family across the street, it's kinda sad," Quen Shoda Howard, another neighbor, added.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Ron Galella Ltd./WireImage(NEW YORK) -- The Rev. Billy Graham, one of the world's most famous Christian evangelists, has died, a family spokesman said Wednesday. He was 99.Graham died at his North Carolina home Wednesday morning, spokesman Mark DeMoss said.At a press briefing Wednesday night, DeMoss said Graham -- whose body he said is currently at Morris Funeral Home in Asheville, North Carolina -- was not in the company of any family members when he died. DeMoss said Graham died in his sleep, and that an attendant nurse would have been the only person with him.DeMoss said Graham's body is slated to move Thursday afternoon to the Billy Graham Training Center in Asheville. A private family prayer service will be held Saturday morning. Beginning Monday, for at least two days, Graham's body will lie in repose at the Graham family home.Then next Friday, a 90-minute funeral will be held at which his son Franklin Graham will speak, in addition to his other children. The hymns chosen for the funeral are some of Graham's favorite. In fact, he personally approved the details of the service years ago.After the funeral, Graham's body will be buried at a cross-shaped brick walkway in the northeast side of the Billy Graham Library, next to his wife Ruth, who was buried in 2007. The interment will be private and family-only. Casket was made by inmates at Louisiana State Penitentiary prison in Angola. Invitations have been extended to President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence, as well as living ex-presidents, DeMoss said.Known as "America's pastor," Graham was a key figure in the revival of the U.S. evangelical Christian movement. The preacher began holding revival meetings in the 1940s and went on to become an adviser to several U.S. presidents.He had been in poor health in recent years, and had turned his international ministry over to son Franklin Graham. Graham did not have cancer, despite reports claiming otherwise, his spokesman said. Despite numerous hospitalizations in recent years, Graham's work remained in the public eye late into his life. In 2011, around his 93rd birthday, he released what The Associated Press said was his 30th book, "Nearing Home: Life, Faith, and Finishing Well," on the subject of aging. Also in 2011, audio files documenting six decades of his ministry were put online in a searchable database.Graham brought evangelical Christianity into the mainstream. As a spiritual adviser to U.S. presidents, he had great access to the White House."Each one I've known long before they ever became president, been in their homes many times; always called them by their first names, until they became president," Graham said of several former presidents.He was especially close to Dwight D. Eisenhower, Lyndon Johnson, Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan and both Bushes.Bill Clinton turned to him after his much publicized sex scandal, and George W. Bush credited Graham with helping him to quit drinking alcohol.When asked how his life would be different if it were not for Billy Graham, George W. Bush said simply, "I wouldn't be president."Donald and Melania Trump met Graham at the preacher's 95th birthday party in 2013, but they never met after Trump took office as president.The evangelist brought his "Billy Graham Crusades" around the world, preaching to more than 210 million people in 185 countries and territories. His largest such gathering drew 1 million people in Seoul, South Korea, in the 1970s. As Graham prepared at age 86 for what he called his final U.S. crusade, a three-day event in New York City the weekend of June 25, 2005, he pondered his own mortality."Do I fear death?" he asked at a news conference. "No. I look forward to death with great anticipation. I'm looking forward to seeing God face to face, and that could happen any day."Graham was met with criticism in February 2002, when audiotapes released by the National Archives revealed a 1972 conversation with Nixon at the White House in which Graham said Jewish pe
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  • ABCNews.com(TALLAHASSE, Fla.) -- As gunshots and screams echoed through his school, Lorenzo Prado said he locked himself in the sound booth at the auditorium at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School and prepared to die.But moments after the gunfire subsided and he thought he was safe, he said he was confronted by six officers pointing guns in his face."On the day of the Douglas massacre, I was a victim like everyone else," Prado, 17, said during an emotional news conference Wednesday in Tallahasse, the Florida state capital. "But my case was different than all the others because on that day, I was a suspected school shooter." The 19-year-old Cruz, a former student at the school, was later arrested off campus after he allegedly killed 14 of Prado's fellow students and three school staffers, including his swimming coach, Hixon."I was just hiding up there. I had no idea what was going on and then the door started to rattle," Prado said. "And, at first, the only thing that came to my mind was, 'I'm going to die, the shooter is going to kill me.'"He said that when the door burst open, he saw the officers and initially thought he was rescued. But he quickly learned, "They thought it was me that killed 17 people.""I go down the stairs and they tell me to put my hands up and I, being the fool that I am, tried putting my phone back in my pocket," he said. "They demanded again, and I, not trying to be one of those news stories of someone dying wrongfully because they refused to put their hands up, I just dropped my phone at that moment and kept going." When he went out the door, he said, "I had six SWAT members pointing their guns at me."Prado said he was tossed to the ground, handcuffed and held at gunpoint "for the degrading and depreciating action of the disturbed individual Nikolas Cruz."He said he was put in a corner with a police officer guarding him."I knew any move I made would be the end of my life," he said. "Throughout the entire event, I only felt two things: I felt fear, as I did not know my future. I did not know if I was going to be let go. I did not know where the terrorist was. ... The second thing was guilt."I felt guilty for closing the door behind me," he continued. "I felt guilty for startling the audience. I felt guilty for the SWAT members who had to pursue me instead of pursuing the murderer. I felt guilty for not contacting my mother. I felt guilty for Coach Hixon, whose life I thought I saved when he walked inside the auditorium but whose life was ended when he walked out again."Prado joined his fellow survivors in Tallahassee Wednesday to meet with legislators to tell their stories of unimaginable horror in the hopes the politicians will take their words to heart and pass laws to make schools safe and ban assault weapons like the one Cruz allegedly used in the attack."If I have to drop everything else in my life just to make these changes happen, I will," Prado said. "To me, to let these victims' lives be taken and without any change in return is an act of treason to our great country."
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  • ABCNews.com(NEW YORK) --  Broward County sheriff's deputies will now carry AR-15 rifles while on school campuses following the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, last week, Sheriff Scott Israel announced today.The new policy was implemented Wednesday morning. In lieu of gun lockers, the only time deputies will not be "slinging a rifle" is when the firearm is locked in police vehicles, Israel said.The rifles will not be fully automatic and will only be handled by deputies who are "trained and qualified" to operate them, Israel said.The suspect in the shooting, 19-year-old Nikolas Cruz, allegedly used a variant of the AR-15 to carry out the deadly attack, which killed 17 people, authorities said.When asked by a reporter what the motive in the shooting was, Israel responded, "Pure evil."Israel suggested a "three-pronged approach" to better secure schools, which includes fortifying the buildings, evaluating how many school resource deputies are needed at each school and sensible gun control."There are some people in this country that shouldn't be allowed to have a gun," Israel said. At least one armed school resource deputy was on campus at the time of the shooting, and his response and actions will be "looked at and scrutinized," Israel said."You're darn right he was prepared to do something about it," Israel said of the school resource deputy.On Wednesday, President Donald Trump held a listening session with students and parents affected by school shootings. In addition, lawmakers in Florida are facing political pressure following the Parkland shooting. Israel thanked the numerous law enforcement agencies that assisted in the shooting response and commended the students who traveled to Tallahassee and Washington, D.C., to speak out about gun control.The sheriff vowed to remain transparent throughout the investigation and keep the public informed as important information comes to light.Cruz was arrested in a residential neighborhood near his former high school more than an hour after the shooting began. He was charged with 17 counts of premeditated murder and is being held in a Broward County jail.
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  • Don Juan Moore/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Florida high school students who survived last week's deadly shooting are demanding gun control say they aren't fighting to get rid of firearms completely, but lawmakers on both sides of the debate must find a "middle ground" to put an end to the violence.Kyle Kashuv, Kai Koerber and Olivia Feller were among dozens of students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland who traveled to Florida's capital city Wednesday to demand gun restrictions, one week after 17 of their classmates and teachers were gunned down. The three students, who appeared on "The View" via satellite from Tallahassee, said they understand the concerns of Americans who firmly support the Second Amendment, which protects "the right of the people to keep and bear Arms.""I totally understand the concern and some aspects I really agree with it," Kashuv, 16, said on "The View" Wednesday. "We have to make sure we get the middle ground. ... Congress has to make sure that they enact laws that distinctly make sure that this can't spiral out of control.""That's why this has become a bipartisan issue," he continued. "We really want to see reform, and the subject isn't taking away all guns; it's making sure atrocities such as these never happen again." For instance, the students said the age to purchase an AR-15-style rifle, the weapon used in the Feb. 14 massacre, shouldn't be younger than the age requirement to purchase a handgun."There should be no distinguishing," said Koerber, 16. "It should be one age per all guns across the board." The Florida state House of Representatives on Tuesday rejected a bill to ban purchases of many assault rifles, like the one 19-year-old Nikolas Cruz allegedly used to open fire at Marjory Stoneman Douglas last week. The bill would have also barred purchases of large-capacity magazines statewide.The 71-36 vote in the Republican-controlled body shocked students who were sitting in the gallery of the Capitol building."Obviously it was a disappointment, but I don't think that this procedural issue should affect the resolve of our movement," Koerber said on "The View" Wednesday. "At the end of the day, our mission is to get people talking. We don't expect to achieve immediate results." Kashuv, Koerber and Feller rallied alongside scores of their classmates as well as hundreds of students from other schools at the state Capitol in Tallahassee this afternoon, calling for legislative action in the wake of one of the deadliest school shootings in U.S. history.Survivors of the Valentine's Day shooting also are planning a "March For Our Lives" in Washington, D.C., on March 24."We are definitely going to make sure that this movement continues and our voices continue to be heard and that no one is able to forget this event in order to prevent mass shootings from happening in the future," Feller, 16, said on "The View" today.She added, "It’s not about a political debate between the two parties, it’s about saving lives."Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- The stepmother of a 5-year-old boy who's been missing since Saturday has been arrested, officials announced Wednesday.Wichita police said 26-year old Emily Glass was arrested for child endangerment as they continue to look for Lucas Hernandez.Sedgwick County jail records indicate Glass was booked at 3:27 p.m. Wednesday afternoon on two counts of child endangerment. Police confirmed that Lucas and another child were involved, but did not identify the other child.Lucas disappeared from his Wichita, Kansas, home around 3 p.m. on Saturday, police said. According to police, Glass told investigators she last saw him in his bedroom just before she took a shower and fell asleep. Police were called to the home about three hours later and have been searching for Lucas ever since.  Lucas' great-aunt Sally Rasmussen told ABC News that she reported possible child abuse to Kansas Child Protective Services in May after seeing a picture of Lucas where it appeared he had marks on his arms and cheeks.Rasmussen did not immediately respond to ABC News' request for comment on the arrest of Glass.The Kansas Department for Children and Families, of which Child Protective Services is a part, said it couldn't share any information on its cases either but expressed worry for Lucas.“We share the public’s concern regarding Lucas Hernandez," Theresa Freed, communications director for Kansas DCF, said in a statement to ABC News. "In the event the agency has information, we will share it with law enforcement, assisting them as requested.” Lucas has not been located yet, but officers expressed hope he will be found alive in a press conference Wednesday afternoon.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved
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