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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Three people are dead after a workplace shooting in Maryland, police said Wednesday.Harford County Sheriff Jeffrey Gahler told reporters that the suspect was still on the loose. The shooting took place inside a business complex at Emmorton Business Park in Edgewood."Multiple injuries reported," the Harford County Sheriff's Office tweeted. A representative from the University of Maryland Medical Center confirmed that two patients believed to be linked to the shooting have been admitted.Both are in critical condition, according to the hospital. Schools in the Edgewood, Maryland, area, are on a "modified lockdown," according to Harford County Public Schools.Edgewood is about a 40-minute drive south of Baltimore. This is a developing story. Please check back for updates. Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A heartbreaking moment unfolded on the tarmac of a Florida airport Tuesday when the widow of a fallen soldier received her husband's casket.Myeshia Johnson, the widow of Sgt. La David Johnson, who was killed during a mission in Niger, was on hand to receive the remains.Footage of the moment shows a pregnant Myeshia Johnson weeping as she leaned over the flag-covered casket.She was accompanied by the couple's 6-year-old daughter, who is seen standing by her mother's side as Myeshia Johnson sobs for several minutes.According to local ABC affiliate WPLG, the casket was transported from Miami International Airport on an interstate closed to other traffic. WPLG reported that police officers and firefighters saluted the vehicle along the route to the funeral home in Hollywood, Florida.Johnson was one of four soldiers killed in Niger when a joint patrol of U.S. and Nigerien forces was ambushed Oct. 4 by militants believed to be linked to ISIS. He was supporting a Green Beret unit on the mission.The handling of Sgt. Johnson's death and the response by President Donald Trump has become a controversial flashpoint.
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  • ABC News(NEW YORK) -- A 5,000-long conveyor belt of moisture called an Atmospheric River has developed in the air over the Pacific Ocean, spanning from Asia to North America.Over the next several days, storms will move along this conveyor belt, bringing more than a foot of rain to parts of western Washington and northern Oregon and several feet of snow to the Cascade mountains. Gusty winds with these storms could be as high as 50 to 60 mph. The National Weather Service has issued flood watches and high wind warnings for Washington state and Oregon.A so-called Atmospheric River is a narrow but a long plume of moisture in the atmosphere, about 450 miles wide but several thousand miles long. Atmospheric rivers transport up to half of the West Coast’s precipitation each year during the rainy season, which spans from October to April.A single Atmospheric River can carry a greater flux of water than the earth's largest river, the Amazon River.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Google Earth(NEW YORK) -- Ravaged by a slew of deadly wildfires in recent days, northern California is set to get a bit of relief this week in the form of rain.A storm system is expected to move over the Pacific Northwest later this week and the trailing cold front will most likely bring some much-needed rain to northern California between Thursday and Friday, according to ABC meteorologists."It will rain a bit but not enough to fully douse the blazes," AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Ken Clark said in a statement Tuesday. "The biggest advantage to firefighters will be the increase in humidity and lower temperatures."Massive wildfires have charred more than 245,000 acres of land statewide in the past week, killing at least 41 people and destroying thousands of homes, according to authorities.Firefighters were battling about a dozen wildfires as of late Tuesday evening, although most of them were more than halfway contained.“The weather today will be warm with low humidity, which will continue to challenge firefighters, but only light winds are forecast,” CalFire said in a statement on Tuesday. “A chance of precipitation is expected to arrive later in the week, bringing relief from the dry conditions.”The northern parts of the Golden State, which has bared the brunt of the fire damage, is forecast to see an influx of cloudy, cooler and wetter weather later in the week, according to AccuWeather.Spotter from Los Osos was reporting sprinkles from this high level moisture. Dry at lower levels. Rain evaporates. Also called "Virga" #cawx pic.twitter.com/sgxj3bdXZQ
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  • northshorefirefighters/Instagram(SANTA CRUZ, Calif.) -- A prison inmate doubling as a volunteer firefighter suffered smoke inhalation on Tuesday while battling a blaze nicknamed "The Bear Fire," fire officials in California confirmed.A professional firefighter also suffered wrist and facial injuries after plunging 50 feet from a torched peak in the mountainous Boulder Creek region of Santa Cruz, California.Each was digging in on a fire line to smother flames that started around 10:30 p.m. local time Monday, Cal Fire officials confirmed to ABC News.“I don’t want to minimize the death of the water tender, but the fact is the injuries are very low for what we’re up against,” Janet Upton, CAL Fire deputy director of communications, told ABC News. “To have so few injuries is remarkable.”The inmate was teamed up with firefighters battling a blaze in Las Cumbres, an elevated region of Santa Cruz that had been evacuated, Cal Fire officials said.The fire has proved difficult to snuff out because of the vertical terrain and limited sunlight that grounded the air support, another Cal Fire official said.The unidentified inmate who suffered the smoke inhalation injury is among the estimated 4,000 inmates fighting the wildfires in Northern California. They are often called the “Angels in Orange.”They are made up of men and women -- and even some juvenile offenders -- who don orange-colored fire gear as they fight fires. They earn a daily wage ranging from $2 a day to $1 an hour.The inmates also command a third of the Cal Fire crews tackling the deadliest cluster of fires in California history, where 41 people have died and thousands of homes have been destroyed.The inmate program was originally put in place in the 1940s to help maintain roadways.Today, it allows 4,000 convicts to leave electric-fenced prisons to be on a camp where a state corrections spokesman said they are paid better than other jobs behind bars, eat grilled steak dinners and get double the credit for good behavior.As volunteer firefighters, they serve under a real fire captain and fan out in 14-member teams where they work like a mowing machine: a team leader or "sawyer" whacks brush and trees down with chainsaws, rakes and pulaskis, which are a cross between an ax and a shovel."They are trained to do a very specific job, by working in crews of about 14 with chainsaws and hand tools and they cut firebreaks," Bill Sessa, a spokesperson for California's Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, told ABC News. "Their job is to slow the fire down or stop it or change its direction."The inmates aren't conscripted.In fact, the gig is one of the most sought after by inmates."They are there because they chose it as a coveted position," Sessa said. "They feel a sense of pride in doing what they do."He went on, "You go into a camp and you would swear that except for their obvious inmate T-shirts and pants, that it's just another firefighter."The vetting process is also very intense. Sessa said the circumstances of an inmate's conviction, the nature of the crime, their behavior in prison, and if they have taken advantage of education and rehabilitation resources are factored into the decision."We tell these inmates, 'You are going to be treated like firefighters. We're only going to treat you like inmates if you are out of bounds,'" Sessa said.Sessa said that it is very rare to have inmates try to abscond from the camps, and almost unheard of for one to cut out on a fire line.But that is exactly what happened on Monday when Armando Castillo, 31, vanished at around 4:45 p.m. near Peters Canyon Regional Park while a crew was engaged in fighting the Canyon Fire 2 in Orange County, according to a statement released by the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation."The people that I've talked to who have been here a long time say they never had that happen before," Sessa said.Castillo, who was set to be released in May of this year,
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- The Trump administration's most recent attempt to ban immigration to the United States from certain foreign countries was put on hold Tuesday by a Hawaiian federal judge.U.S. District Court Judge Derrick Watson, responsible for blocking President Donald Trump's second travel ban in March, authored the ruling again Tuesday, which notes that the third executive order on the matter ignored the "guidance afforded" by the earlier legal proceedings related to the issue."EO-3 suffers from precisely the same maladies as its predecessor: it lacks sufficient findings that the entry of more than 150 million nationals from six specified countries would be 'detrimental to the interests of the United States,' a precondition that the Ninth Circuit determined must be satisfied," reads the ruling."And EO-3 plainly discriminates based on nationality in the manner that the Ninth Circuit has found antithetical to... the founding principles of this Nation," the ruling continues.The court granted the plaintiffs' request for a temporary restraining order which will block the order from going into effect Wednesday. The order prohibited immigration to the U.S. from Chad, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Syria and Yemen.The White House responded to the ruling with a statement Tuesday afternoon, writing that the "dangerously flawed district court order undercuts the President’s efforts to keep the American people safe and enforce minimum security standards for entry into the United States.""The entry restrictions in the proclamation apply to countries based on their inability or unwillingness to share critical information necessary to safely vet applications, as well as a threat assessment related to terrorism, instability, and other grave national security concerns," the statement added. "These restrictions are vital to ensuring that foreign nations comply with the minimum security standards required for the integrity of our immigration system and the security of our Nation."The White House further indicated that the Department of Justice will defend the action.Doug Chin, the attorney general of Hawaii, the state which challenged the ban, issued a statement which noted that "this is the third time Hawaii has gone to court to stop President Trump from issuing a travel ban that discriminates against people based on their nation of origin or religion.""Today is another victory for the rule of law," Chin said in the statement. "We stand ready to defend it.”Tuesday's ruling does not impact travelers from North Korea or certain Venezuelan government officials and their families because the plaintiffs did not challenge those aspects of the executive order.This is a developing story. Please check back for updates.
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