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  • ABC News(NEW YORK) -- Monday's total solar eclipse will come to Americans in varying degrees of visual clarity, according to ABC News meteorologists, who say that the clearest skies are likely to appear in the Northwest in cities like San Francisco, Salem and Seattle.New York, and parts of the Tennessee Valley, around Nashville, are also more likely to have unobstructed viewing of the phenomenon.Some cloud cover is expected in parts of the Midwest, according to ABC News meteorologists path of totality -- namely states like Kansas, Missouri and Iowa.The Southeast coast of the U.S. -- from North Carolina to Georgia -- is among the areas in danger of enduring cloud cover during the eclipse.NASA has published an interactive map that shows the times for the partial and total eclipse anywhere in world. The path of totality crosses over portions of many major cities.What happens during a total solar eclipse?During a total solar eclipse, the lunar shadow will darken the sky and temperatures will drop, while bright stars and planets will appear at a time that is normally broad daylight.Retired NASA astrophysicist and photographer Fred Espenak said the experience usually lasts for just a couple minutes, but it's truly out of this world."It is unlike any other experience you've ever had," Espenak, popularly known as Mr. Eclipse, told ABC News. "It's a visceral experience; you feel it. The hair on your arms, on the back of your neck, stand up. You get goosebumps."You have to be there," he added.Espenak said the rare and striking astronomical event can last as long as seven minutes. For the Aug. 21 eclipse, NASA anticipates the longest period when the moon obscures the sun's entire surface from any given location along its path will last about two minutes and 40 seconds.Some animals may react strangely to the celestial phenomenon. Rick Schwartz, an animal behavior expert with the San Diego Zoo, said there have been observations of animals going to sleep during total solar eclipses."The animals take the visual cues of the light dimming, and the temperature cues," Schwartz told ABC News."You hear the increase of bird calls and insects that you usually associate with nightfall," he added. "Farmers have said that the cows lay down on the field or the chickens go back into the coop."
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  • Chicago Police(CHICAGO) -- The Northwestern University professor and Oxford University financial officer accused of fatally stabbing the professor's boyfriend in a Chicago high-rise allegedly committed the crime as part of a sexual fantasy hatched online, prosecutors said on Sunday.Wyndham Lathem, who was a faculty member at Northwestern's microbiology-immunology department for 10 years, and a second suspect, University of Oxford employee Andrew Warren, were both taken into custody without incident in Northern California on August 4 after a nationwide manhunt.Lathem, 43, and Warren spent more than one week on the run after allegedly killing 26-year-old hairstylist Trenton Cornell-Duranleau, who was found stabbed to death at a Chicago apartment registered to Lathem on July 27. At a press conference this afternoon, police described the scene as "savage and grizzly."Cornell-Duranleau was Lathem's boyfriend, Officer Eddie Johnson, Superintendent of Police with the Chicago Police Department said at a press conference on Sunday.The two suspects in Cornell-Duranleau's murder met on the internet, Chicago Police Commander Brendan Deenihan said this afternoon, and Warren came to the U.S. to meet Latham.Deenihan said on Sunday that on July 27, doorman at Lathem's building received an anonymous call that a crime may have been committed on the premises. Corenell's body was soon discovered with multiple stab wounds. Two knives, one of which was broken, were found at the scene.Witnesses say they heard what sounded like a fight at 5 a.m., according to Deenihan.Latham, who police say was staying in a hotel close to his apartment building, had picked up Warren at Chicago's O'Hare airport several days before the alleged crime took place. Police said that surveillance footage from the apartment and hotel area at the time captured Lathem in the area with Cornell.According to police, while Lathem was on the run, he sent a video message to various friends and family members apologizing for his alleged involvement in the killing. Lathem had described the killing as the biggest mistake of his life, according to Chicago police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi.Guglielmi also said the two suspects donated $1,000 in the victim’s name to the public library in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. Police said Sunday that it is unclear why that library location was chosen.Lathem, who has been a faculty member at Northwestern's microbiology-immunology department for 10 years, has been banned from entering the school, according to Alan Cubbage, Northwestern University vice president for university relations.
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  • Spencer Platt/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- The weekend after a white nationalist rally collapsed into chaos in Charlottesville, Virginia, leading to the alleged murder of an anti-racism activist, protests erupted across the country against white supremacy, racism and the presence of Confederate monuments.Boston, Massachusetts Tens of thousands counterprotesting a rally purporting to be about free speech swarmed Boston on Saturday, leading to a few conflicts with police and widespread attention from traditional and social media.A total of 33 arrests were made Saturday in Boston, primarily resulting from disorderly conduct and alleged assaults against police officers, the Boston Police Department said. Police indicated that some demonstrators were throwing rocks and bottles of urine, but that did not represent the majority of participants, according to Police Commissioner William Evans."99.9 percent of the people here were for the right reasons" and participated peacefully, Evans said.Dallas, TexasThousands of demonstrators gathered around the area of Dallas City Hall Saturday at a rally calling for unity, according to ABC affiliate WFAA-TV.More than a dozen activists, politicians and faith leaders spoke prior to a candlelight vigil, the affiliate reported.Tensions were high near Confederate War Memorial Park, where calls have been growing to remove statues commemorating Civil War veterans who fought for the Confederacy, WFAA-TV reported.
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  • Joe Raedle/Getty Images(PALM BEACH, Fla.) -- A number of high-profile charitable organizations have withdrawn fundraising events and galas from President Trump's Mar-a-Lago club in Palm Beach, Florida, amid growing backlash against the president's response to the deadly violence that broke out in Charlottesville.The Preservation Foundation of Palm Beach announced on Saturday that it was pulling out of an event at Mar-a-Lago. "The Preservation Foundation of Palm Beach is a nonprofit dedicated to protecting and celebrating the unique architectural and cultural heritage of Palm Beach. Given the current environment surrounding Mar-a-Lago, we have made the decision to move our annual dinner dance," read a message on its Facebook page.On Friday, the Susan G. Komen Foundation, the American Red Cross and the Salvation Army all confirmed to ABC News that they are no longer going to be holding their fundraising events at Mar-a-Lago this upcoming year.“The Salvation Army relies heavily on fundraising events like The Holiday Snow Ball in Palm Beach to further our mission of helping those in need through a range of social services including food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, clothing and shelter for the homeless, and opportunities for the underprivileged," the Salvation Army wrote in a statement, "Because the conversation has shifted away from the purpose of this event, we will not host it at Mar-a-Lago.”On Thursday, the American Cancer Society -- which has held events at Mar-a-Lago since 2009 -- along with the Cleveland Clinic, both announced they were pulling fundraising events scheduled at the club for next year."Our values and commitment to diversity are critical as we work to address the impact of cancer in every community. It has become increasingly clear that the challenge to those values is outweighing other business considerations," the American Cancer Society wrote in a statement.These organizations join a growing list of groups that are changing the venues for their fundraising events, many saying they want to avoid being politicized.The Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Leaders in Furthering Education (LIFE) have also said they are changing venues for events previously scheduled at Mar-a-Lago.“America was founded on the principles of life, liberty and justice for all. In the 241 years since, millions of Americans of all religions, races, creeds, color, gender and sexual orientation have died -- and millions more have been disabled -- fighting to protect these values and freedoms. Now, however, our great nation is under siege by those who seek to undermine and obliterate these principles. Indeed, the hatred, vitriol, and anti-Semitic and racist views being spewed by neo-Nazis and white supremacists are repugnant and repulsive -- and they are antithetical to everything that this country, and I, personally stand for," Lois Pope, a philanthropist and veterans advocate who founded LIFE, wrote in a statement provided to ABC News.Other groups that have pulled events from Mar-a-Lago include the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, American Friends of Magen David Adom and the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute.The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society cited the security hassles of hosting an event at Mar-a-Lago as a reason for their switching venues.Palm Beach Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Laurel Baker, who has been outspoken about organizations continuing to hold fundraising events at Mar-a-Lago, told ABC News: “I’ve been carrying around this quote with me for a while. It’s from Dante: ‘The darkest places in hell are reserved for those who maintain their neutrality in times of moral crisis.’ ”Baker also told ABC News that she expects more and more organizations to pull events in the coming weeks, but that those decisions are best left up to the organizations themselves. Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Brent N. Clarke/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- The death of comedian and activist Dick Gregory at age 84 on Saturday prompted a flood of tributes on Twitter from celebrities, activists and others.Jane Sanders recalled how her husband -- Bernie Sanders, Democratic senator from Vermont and former presidential candidate -- once spent a night in jail with Gregory after protesting segregation in Chicago.
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  • Justin Sullivan/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- The numbers for the $541.9 million Powerball jackpot were drawn Saturday night -- but there was no winner.
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