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  • moodboard/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Following Monday's bombing that killed 22 and injured 59 at an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England, there are currently no plans to make significant security changes in the United States, according to a Department of Homeland Security official.The DHS official said that the federal security posture in the U.S. is already at high levels and that there is not much more to be done in the aftermath of the attack, allegedly carried out by 22-year-old Salman Abedi with an improvised explosive device outside the concert at the Manchester Arena.The official did insist that federal authorities will continually assess whether any new measures are warranted.ABC News has additionally learned that state and local fusion centers across the country -- which include representatives from local, state and federal agencies -- are working to identify potentially vulnerable "open venues" and upcoming events in their regions, so that they can help local police put together their latest security plans for those events and venues.The FBI is also holding a call later this afternoon with law enforcement across the country to lay out what they know so far about the Manchester attack and urge vigilance. The call will be hosted by FBI headquarters, and it will include the heads of FBI field offices across the country, as well as leaders from state and local law enforcement agencies across the country.
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  • WABC-TV(NEWARK, N.J.) -- Newark Liberty International Airport was temporarily closed on Tuesday night after a plane engine caught fire.Emergency chutes were deployed from United 1579 and passengers evacuated after "flames were reported coming from the right side of the engine," according to the Federal Aviation Administration. The Boeing 757 was headed to San Francisco from Newark, New Jersey, when the control tower notified the United Airlines crew of the apparent flames while the plane was taxiing, United spokesman Jonathan Guerin said in a statement.There was one minor injury, according to the spokesman."Customers are being transported back to the terminal," the statement said. "We are working to get our customers to San Francisco as soon as possible.”Newark Airport said in a tweet the airport was closed for the safety of passengers and to expect delays.
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  • Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- The budget released by the White House Tuesday contains proposed changes for the program that provides access to food for Americans who otherwise might not be able to afford it.And anti-hunger advocates aren't pleased. Lucy Melcher, associate director for advocacy with the anti-hunger group No Kid Hungry, argues that the proposed cuts are “devastating” to a program that research shows lifts people out of poverty.The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, more commonly known as food stamps or SNAP, is the “hunger safety net” for Americans in poverty or out of work. Americans who make up to 130 percent of the poverty level, which is a monthly income of $2,600 for a family of four, are eligible for food stamps.More than 44 million Americans participated in the food stamp program in 2016, according to the USDA. The number of people using the program increased during the economic recession and have fluctuated since 2010.The decreased proposal in Trump’s budget is based on their estimate that fewer people will be on food stamps next year, but it also includes reforms that estimate it would reduce funding for SNAP by $190 million over the next ten years.That much bigger cut is proposed under legislation that the administration plans to bring to Congress. The changes would tighten requirements for waivers that allow people who are considered capable of working but can’t find a job to stay on the program.More than 75 percent of households who participate in SNAP have worked a job in the year before or after the receive benefits, according to the USDA. They are limited to three months of benefits unless they get a waiver from the state, such as if they live in an area where there are not enough jobs available. The administration was not clear on how it's proposal would restrict these waivers but it could mean that people who are capable of working but can't find a job have a harder time qualifying for benefits.Office of Management and Budget director Mick Mulvaney said the cuts were an effort to get more people back to work, saying that people that needed food stamps during the recession are still on the program.“If you’re paying for it isn’t it reasonable for you to at least ask that question aren’t there people on that program who shouldn’t be on there?” Mulvaney asked during a briefing with reporters on Tuesday.But No Kid Hungry's Melcher said the budget doesn’t invest in programs to help people find work or help people
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  • Bill Pugliano/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- The U.S. government filed suit Tuesday against Fiat Chrysler, alleging the automaker equipped more than 100,000 vehicles with so-called defeat devices that circumvent federal emission standards.The software -- installed on diesel-fueled Jeep Grand Cherokee and Ram 1500 in model years 2013 to 2016 -- allegedly caused the vehicles' emission system to "perform differently and less effectively during certain normal driving conditions than on federal emissions tests," resulting in nitrogen oxide emissions above allowable levels during day-to-day driving, the Environmental Protection Agency said.Fiat Chrysler maintains that its software was designed to detect not testing conditions specifically but temperature and factors that could damage the engines if emission controls were activated.The automaker "intends to defend itself vigorously, particularly against any claims that the company engaged in any deliberate scheme to install defeat devices to cheat U.S. emissions tests," it said in a statement, adding that its officials have been working with the EPA to "clarify issues related to the company's emissions control technology."The allegations against Fiat Chrysler come on the heels of a huge settlement with Volkswagen, which in March plead guilty to intentionally thwarting EPA standards with different defeat devices installed in more than half a million cars in the United States. Volkswagen agreed to pay $4.3 billion in criminal and civil penalties.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(COLLEGE PARK, Md.) -- Bowie State University honored senior student Richard Collins III during its commencement ceremony on Tuesday, just days after he was stabbed to death at the University of Maryland, College Park.During Tuesday's ceremony, Bowie State President Mickey Burnim honored Collins with a posthumous bachelor's degree that was accepted by family and fellow cadets on his behalf.Collins, 23, was stabbed in the chest Saturday, allegedly by 22-year-old University of Maryland student Sean Urbanski, according to police. He was set to graduate Tuesday and was recently commissioned in the Army as a second lieutenant, officials said.Urbanski has been charged with first-degree murder, second-degree murder and first-degree assault. He is being held without bond and is due in court next month.Police called the attack random and "totally unprovoked."The University of Maryland's police department said it has asked the FBI to assist in the investigation after it discovered that Urbanski, who is white, belonged to a Facebook group named "Alt-Reich." Collins was black.Bowie State, a historically black college located in Maryland, held a candlelight vigil in honor of Collins on Monday at 7 p.m. local time.The school honored Collins with a cap and gown draped over a chair at Tuesday's ceremony and with a moment of silence."It is a tragic loss to see our national treasure, in the form of Lt. Collins, taken away from us in this manner," FBI spokesman Gordon Johnson said at a press conference Sunday.People who knew Collins described him as a "good young man" who was excited about his future.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- The deadly blast outside the security barriers of an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England, marks the latest instance where a terror attack unfolded at a location that symbolized Western culture and also provided a so-called soft target.Experts tell ABC News that soft targets offer terrorists both practical and symbolic value.John Cohen, a former counter-terrorism coordinator for the Department of Homeland Security, listed concert venues, transportation hubs, hotels, shopping malls and sports venues as examples of soft targets."They are places that are difficult to harden because that would undermine the very reason they exist," said Cohen, who is now an ABC News consultant.Manchester has now canceled concerts scheduled for later this week as musicians around the world expressed their horror and condolences.Karen Greenberg, director of the Center on National Security at Fordham University School of Law, said that an attack at a concert carries deep cultural connotations."The symbolism of attacking Westerners who are enjoying themselves is what makes it an attractive target,” said Greenberg, who is also the author of Rogue Justice: The Making of the Security State. "Terrorism is making civilians feel unsafe in their space.”Evolving protection techniquesSecurity precautions have been ramped up throughout much of the U.S. and Europe in recent years in light of other attacks, though Greenberg said that in focusing on more obvious, high-profile targets, law enforcement may have merely diverted the possibility of attack into other areas."We’ve made it so secure in places that are known targets that they’ve pushed attacks into more marginalized places,” Greenberg said. “That’s an interesting part of what’s happened. Law enforcement has to secure not just the central places, but recognize what that means in terms of where it pushes an attack.”Cohen noted that the evolving nature of how terror groups operate have placed soft targets in the sights of would-be terrorists who have not undergone military training.“The tactics of groups like AQAP [Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula] and ISIS have changed, where they have sought to inspire [followers] primarily through the internet and social media," Cohen said. "Attacking a soft target doesn’t require a high degree of planning and support. You can essentially get your weapon, go to a public place and kill or injure as many people as you can.”Cohen said that law enforcement officials are adapting by expanding the process by which they identify threatening individuals before an attack and determining "whether someone who comes to the attention of law enforcement poses a threat of carrying out one of these attacks.""At the end of the day it is extraordinarily difficult to secure every soft target within a jurisdiction, so our success in reducing these types of attacks will only come when we're better able to identify those within our communities who are potential attackers and prevent them from committing an act of violence," Cohen said.Preparing the public moving forwardThe prospect of eliminating the public's proximity to soft targets isn't necessarily possible, and Cohen notes how politicians and local officials regularly encourage people to continue to live their daily lives normally after such an attack.That kind of encouragement is a way of combatting the second impact of a terror attack, which is the fear that terrorism instills in people in an effort to change their ways.Greenberg said that attacks on soft targets have "succeeded in a lot of ways" in that they replace the public's sense of safety with one of fear."Since 9/11 in this country, since 7/7 in Britain, there’s a heightened sense of fear about going about daily life," she said, referencing attacks in 2001 and 2005, respectively. "If one of the things they are attacking is peace of mind in our daily life, they can
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