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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- It's been approximately half a year since the watershed #MeToo movement sparked in Hollywood and spread like wildfire, leaving almost no industry untouched as hundreds of women came forward with stories of sexual misconduct they have been subjected to in the workplace.In the aftermath of the new, post-#MeToo reality that has upended offices across the country, Good Morning America spoke to two generations of people in the workplace -- one group in their 20s and one in their 50s -- to hear how things have changed."I think we're creating them," Alexis, a young woman in her 20s, said of the new workplace rules. "Our society has made a decision to take off our blinders and re-evaluate what's acceptable in our culture.""We've had rules that have existed," Alexis added. "But I think we're deciding to make those more clear."Are compliments still allowed in the workplace?German, a teacher in his 50s, said sometimes he worries about how compliments that he gives at work can be misconstrued.At school, German said he saw a fellow teacher and noted her appearance. "I just passed by and said, 'Oh, you look beautiful,' because she looked beautiful," he said. "And then I said, 'Oh, what did I say?'"German added "you never know anymore" whether his compliment could be misconstrued as offensive.The younger group was, for the most part, more adamant that comments about one's appearance should not be a part of workplace banter."If you comment to my appearance at work, I don't agree with that," Padma, who is in her 20s, said. "Really, any comment you want to give me, I want it related to my work.""We don't have to talk about our physical appearances or how we think someone looks," Padma added. "There are other ways to relate."Noemie, also in her 20s, said compliments are acceptable at work as long as they are "friendly" and "never" cross the "line" past friendship.Robyn, in her 50s, however, said she believes compliments "are one of the things that create rapport.""Rapport is something that is really important to solidifying and improving human relationships," Robyn added.When the two groups came together to talk, the generational divide became more apparent."Do you really think people should not give compliments?" Robyn said.Padma said, "If you just meet someone or someone who is a manager or supervisor, I don't think that's appropriate."Rafael, who is in his 50s, responded, "Sometimes a compliment is just a compliment.""If somebody says, 'Nice shirt,' I just think I got on a nice shirt," Rafael said.Joanne Lipman, the author of That's What She Said: What Men Need to Know and Women Need to Tell Them About Working Together, said 20-somethings hold more anger over what they see as unfair."Younger people have an anger," Lipman said. "And particularly very young women -- there's an anger there about the injustice.""They're really focused on not just male versus female," Lipman added. "But they're looking at the double-bind -- the triple-bind -- that women face if they belong to another underrepresented group."They're highly focused on that in a way that older people are not."Do we have to renegotiate how we're all getting along?Andrew, in his 20s, said that as workplaces acclimatize to the new reality, "there will be tensions" and he believes "we have to go into this with an open mind.""As times change," Rafael, in his 50s, added, "things change, you have to change."Alan, also in his 50s, added that it doesn't mean you have to "give up" your "core values."Robyn chimed in that "change takes work."
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  • ABC(NEW YORK) -- Amazon's latest delivery service will let customers receive packages inside their parked cars, the company announced Tuesday, giving ABC's "Good Morning America" an exclusive first look.The latest iteration of Amazon Key -- the service launched last November that allows a delivery person to drop a package off inside customers' homes -- will let delivery people have access to someone's parked car, as long as the vehicle is parked in a publicly accessible place.The in-car delivery service comes at no extra cost for Prime members, who pay an annual subscription fee. To use the new service, customers simply have to download the Amazon Key App, link it to their connected car and then place an order.In-car delivery service is available starting Tuesday in 37 U.S. cities, and is compatible with many 2015 or newer Chevrolet, Buick, GMC, Cadillac or Volvo models."This is just one more step to make it easy for that Amazon customer to get their product," Hitha Herzog, a consumer expert and the chief research officer of H Squared Research, told ABC News' chief business, technology and economics correspondent Rebecca Jarvis."Since launching Amazon Key last November, we've safely delivered everything from cameras to collectible coins inside the home. Customers have also told us they love features like keyless guest access and being able to monitor their front door from anywhere with the Amazon Key App," Peter Larsen, Amazon's vice president of delivery technology, said in a statement."In-car delivery gives customers that same peace of mind and allows them to take the Amazon experience with them," Larsen added.When Amazon launched in-home delivery service last November, it was immediately met with many safety questions associated with allowing a stranger access to one's home.Despite initial concerns, Amazon told ABC News in a statement that, "Customers are rating their in-home deliveries positively," and that in Amazon's Key App it has an "an average of 4.78 out of 5 stars.""Security is one of the things that has been most important to us as we ... build this service," Larsen told Jarvis, adding that the service has been run through a "rigorous security review."In addition, customers receive notifications each step of the way when a package is en route to their car, and can choose to block a delivery up until the package is in the car.On top of a notification in the morning saying that a package is going to be delivered, "Right before the delivery driver shows up at your house, you get another notification that says, 'Your vehicle is in the correct delivery area. And we're going be arriving soon,'" Larsen told ABC News."You can click through to the Amazon Key app, and you see that ... a green circle, which is the area in which your car needs to be," Larsen said. "After it has been delivered, you get a final notification."Once the package is in the car, the Amazon driver must swipe on the delivery app to lock the trunk before moving onto their next stop. If a customers wants, Larsen said, he or she can see on the app "exactly what time the car was unlocked and what time the car was re-locked."
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  • ABC News(NEW YORK) -- Korean beauty products -- otherwise known as K-Beauty -- have taken the internet by storm, popping up on social media posts by celebrities.These viral products and regimen are not only limited to celebrities and beauty bloggers. The latest Korean craze has lined up beauty aisles of big stores like Walmart and Target – a slice of the estimated $7.1 billion K-Beauty market in 2016."Nightline" traveled to the source of some of the more exotic ingredients in South Korea to understand the reason behind the popularity of these products.Thirty miles outside Seoul, the fortune of Farmer Lee's donkey farm turned around when the animal’s milk became an important source of a core K-Beauty ingredient – milk.Historically, donkeys were the preferred means of transport for Korean aristocrats because of their slow pace, but today the entire farm is dedicated to producing milk that ends up in beauty products.On this particular farm, donkeys are milked manually after which the milk is immediately frozen. Rumor has it that the milk has so many benefits that even Cleopatra bathed in it.And, donkeys are not alone.Snails, which were traditionally used as food, have also made a comeback with Korean beauty companies using snail mucus as an ingredient in some of their most popular products.Yongho Kim owns a farm with around 300,000 snails whose mucus is extracted very carefully.“For two to three days, you don't feed the snail and you clean it - you can't have any waste,” Yongho Kim told “Nightline.” “And then you gently tickle the snail. Then the snail gets mad and it creates mucin.”Once collected, the ingredients are taken to the laboratory to be made into products.“Donkey's milk has much more protein than cow's milk, and it is known for its properties for immunity,” a chemist for the Korean beauty company Soo Ae explained to “Nightline.” “Snail mucin is also a very sticky mucus, so it helps create a barrier on your skin to prevent your skin from drying out.”Some skeptics believe that the craze isn't about the purported benefits of Korean beauty products - rather, it's a successful concerted marketing effort by the Korean government to advertise their products cool and desirable."The Korean cool concept started out kind of on a lark but it became a government priority and government necessity after the Asian financial crisis," Euny Hong, author of "The Birth of Korean Cool," told "Nightline."According to Hong, the South Korean government realized after the Asian financial crisis in 1997 that by depending on just a few mega-conglomerates like Samsung for the GDP, they were leaving themselves at risk for major economic crises."If one big company defaults in Korea, everyone is kind of in trouble," Hong said. "And they realized we need other industries. We can't just have these heavy industries, we can't just do semiconductors."The South Korean government's solution? Investing into pop culture as a major focus in economic diversification.“One of the ideas floated was, why don’t we focus on popular culture because you don’t need a big infrastructure to enter this business? You don’t have to build factories, you just need time and talent,” Hong said.That sparked a national effort by the South Korean government to export culture as an attractive selling point to an outside audience."They financed the translation of all the dramas at the beginning, and even now they pay for translation into all sorts of obscure languages," said Hong.The investment has paid off in not just popularizing Korean dramas, K-Pop, a South Korean music genre and K-Beauty, but in also creating symbiotic relationships between them.According to Hong, K-Pop stars have frequently become brand ambassadors for K-beauty products, which in turn reap benefits for the farmers producing the raw materials in South Korea and beauty companies like Soo Ae, whi
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  • ABCNews.com(WASHINGTON) -- Reality TV star Kourtney Kardashian arrived on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., Tuesday morning to make a push for safer personal care products.Kardashian is holding meetings with lawmakers, aides and reporters on Tuesday to express her support for legislation that would give the U.S. Food and Drug Administration the power to investigate and prevent the sales of dangerous cosmetics. The proposed legislation is expected to suggest that facilities be registered to the FDA and could be subject to suspension if they distribute such harmful personal care products.Kardashian's interest in promoting safer, nontoxic cosmetics grew after the birth of her first child in 2009, she told Capitol Hill reporters Tuesday morning."It all kind of snowballed," she described. Research prompted by her mother's friends led her to the Environmental Working Group, whose representatives have accompanied Kardashian during much of her visit to Washington."It would be nice if we didn't have to guess as much," she said. "If there were regulations to know that the products that we're using are safe."Following a morning press event with the Environmental Working Group, the "Keeping Up With the Kardashians" co-star was set to hold a closed briefing with Congressional aides at 4 p.m.Lawmakers including Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, Rep. Frank Pallone, D-N.J. and Rep. Leonard Lance, R-N.J. banged the cosmetics safety drum during the last Congress, but the bills never reached a vote.A congressional aide told ABC News House and Senate bills are being worked on, but the timeline is unclear.
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  • Spencer Platt/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Roku Inc. Tuesday announced that The Roku Channel will be the launch destination for ABC News Live, a new 24/7 live and linear news stream from anchor partner ABC News.
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  • ABC News(DETROIT) -- Drivers in Detroit got to see a rare phenomenon this winter: Corvettes trudging through the snowy and wet city streets alongside SUVs and trucks. The engineers behind the new ZR1 -- billed as the fastest and most powerful Corvette ever built -- were required to drive the 755 horsepower sports car to and from the office every day, on the weekend and wherever they needed to go. The idea was to demonstrate that the car was as easy to handle on the road as it was on the track.“It was a riot to drive in the winter,” Tadge Juechter, executive chief engineer of Corvette, told reporters last week in Atlanta who assembled in the Peach State to get a first look at the ZR1. “No one got stuck at all.”Engineers proudly showed off photos of the ZR1 buried under heaps of snow, regaling this reporter with stories of how the rear-wheel-drive car perfectly maneuvered in the treacherous weather conditions. (Yes, these cars were equipped with snow tires).The $120,000 ZR1 can conquer winter. It performs in all seasons and moonlights as a daily driver. It sets production-car lap records on professional racetracks. And “you can teach a 16-year-old how to drive a stick on this car. It’s a piece of cake,” Juechter noted.Yet Corvette, the longest-running nameplate in automobile history, still feels that it has to prove itself after 65 years.“There was a little bit of a stigma around the Corvette that maybe it was not as sophisticated, maybe a little cruder than some of the imported cars,” Juechter told ABC News. “Even though we advanced the car quite a bit and have gotten a lot of credit globally for how sophisticated the car is, the impression, especially on the coasts and in urban areas, really hadn’t caught up with the car.”Jerry Burton, a Corvette historian who has written three books on the brand, said the Corvette, a sports car “cobbled together” by Chevrolet in 1953, had become a “symbol of American ingenuity” over the years. It may not have the same pedigree as a Lamborghini or a Ferrari but the Corvette can still compete with these cars, he told ABC News.“Corvettes had developed bad baggage in the 1970s. People thought of gold chains and divorced men and it was very uncool to be in a Corvette back then,” he explained. “Today, the car is very sophisticated. Even the most begrudging car enthusiast will respect the Corvette. It has shown itself to be a better car.”Terry Popkin, a master ambassador to the National Corvette Museum and the Corvette Club of America, has driven a Corvette every day for the last 54 years, including a 1991 ZR1.Early Corvettes “were by no means refined,” he admitted. “The car would sometimes leak, it was noisy. The door hatches would break.”That changed by 1984, when the handling improved remarkably and the Corvette “really came into its own,” he said. In the early 1990s the ZR1 was crowned “King of the Hill” for being the fastest production car in the world and breaking every “standing endurance speed record,” he said.Corvettes “are the best bang for the buck,” Popkin added. “It’s an amazingly fast supercar that rides like a Cadillac.”Few gear heads will question the ZR1’s scary fast acceleration – zero to 60 mph in 2.85 seconds – and power. Corvette claims the ZR1’s top speed is 212 mph (208 mph for the convertible version) and delivers 715 lb-ft of torque thanks to its hand-built LT5 small block Gen 5 6.2L supercharged V8 engine. I never got to truly experience that speed with the ZR1, but that was intentional. Corvette engineers repeatedly warned journalists to take it easy on Road Atlanta, one of the most challenging and tricky racetracks in the world and one where some have died testing their limits.“755 hp will kill you,” Popkin, who has trained with p
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