Business News | AM1460 WIXN
  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Hundreds of women are claiming rampant sexual harassment at Sterling Jewelers — the conglomerate that runs Kay and Jared jewelry chains — going back two decades.The women say that jobs and promotions were determined by pleasing male managers and went all the way to the top of the company’s highest levels.Watch the ABC News report below for more:
    Read more...
  • Stockbyte/ThinkstockIt's officially tax season. That means there's a chance you'll hear from someone who sounds threatening."It might be an email, a phone call from someone pretending to be from the IRS or even pretending to be from law enforcement" demanding immediate payment, maybe with a credit card "or even in some cases they will ask you to pay with a gift card," warns ABC News Chief Business and Economics Correspondent Rebecca Jarvis. "This is a scam."Her advice? Hang up.If the IRS needs to get in touch with you about something, it will use old-fashioned snail mail. "You never ever, ever want to give out any kind of credit card information over the phone. You never are going to be threatened over the phone by the IRS that you are going to go to jail if you don't pay right away," explains Jarvis.That doesn't mean you can't call the IRS if you have a question about something. And remember: The real IRS always is happy to take a check.
    Read more...
  • Credit: Twitter(NEW YORK) -- Twitter is taking action to make its community safer, the company announced in a blog post on Wednesday.Twitter has been criticized by a growing number of its users for what critics say is an insufficient and too-slow response to abuse on its platform. On Wednesday, the company's Vice President of Engineering Ed Ho posted on the Twitter blog that changes have been made over the last few weeks to keep Twitter users safe.In recent weeks, Ho writes, an updated manner of reporting abusive tweets, preventing the creation of abusive accounts and implementation of safer search results were all put in place. Now, the company says, it will leverage its technology to continue fighting online abuse.Twitter will look to identify abusive accounts even if they haven't been reported, and then to limit the functionality of those accounts for a period of time. The social media platform has also worked to expand its "mute" feature, which allows messages with certain words or phrases, or from specific users, to be hidden. Now, Twitter says, users will be able to decide how long a mute is put in place for. Additionally, Twitter users will be able to filter out posts from "certain types of accounts" including "those without a profile photo, unverified email addresses or phone numbers." That action would allow users to avoid dealing with "eggs" or users who create accounts without uploading their own photo -- often to harass others.Finally, the company says that it will be more transparent about the reporting process. Users who report accounts or tweets for being abusive or spam-related will now receive notifications when their report is received and if further action is taken by the company.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
    Read more...
  • BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Image(WASHINGTON) — In case you were wondering what designer the first lady donned Tuesday night for her husband’s joint address to Congress, Melania Trump sparkled in a black Michael Kors suit.The suit's sequined blazer was embroidered with flowers and cinched at the waist with a wide black belt.Meanwhile, a number of female lawmakers wore white, which is historically a symbolic color for the women's suffrage movement. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., tweeted a photo stating that Democratic women were wearing white in support of women's rights earlier Tuesday evening.President Donald Trump, Vice President Mike Pence and Speaker of the House Paul Ryan all donned blue ties, instead of the red that is traditionally associated with the Republican Party.President Trump's eldest daughter, Ivanka Trump, wore a magenta asymmetrical dress by Roland Mouret.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
    Read more...
  • adempercem/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- It's one very tiny step for women-kind: In the shadow of the hit "Hidden Figures," which highlighted a group of African-American women and their contribution to the U.S. space program, LEGO has announced it will sell a "Women of NASA" set of its Minifigures.The idea was the brainchild of Maia Weinstock, a science writer and editor, who submitted to LEGO that the company should highlight the efforts of a number of prominent women.The announced set includes mathematician and NASA trajectory expert Katherine Johnson, whom Taraji P. Henson played in "Hidden Figures." Also featured are Margaret Hamilton, an MIT computer scientist who developed the flight software for the Apollo craft; Sally Ride, the first American woman in space; astronaut and physicist Nancy Grace Roman; and Mae Jemison, an entrepreneur, astronaut and doctor who was the first African-American woman in space."We’re really excited to be able to introduce Maia’s 'Women of NASA' set for its inspirational value as well as build and play experience," a rep for the company said, adding that the company hopes the toys will inspire girls to pursue careers in STEM -- that is, science, technology, engineering and math.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
    Read more...
  • ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- The full details of President Trump’s budget aren’t even out yet, and already there's blowback against the White House is.Former top military leaders who served on the frontlines and congressional leaders in the president’s party are all speaking out, trying to stop the administration from slashing funds for foreign aid and American diplomacy."It's going nowhere," Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., said of the likelihood that Congress would approve such a budget.The White House announced Monday that it wants a 10 percent increase in military spending, roughly equal to $54 billion, with an equal amount of cuts from the “non-defense” budget -- historic levels not seen since the early Reagan administration.Executive agencies, including the State Department, are reviewing the plan now before the White House submits a final budget to Congress by March 16, but there have been reports that the plan could include up to a 30 percent cut to the State Department’s budget or the elimination of whole divisions, such as the envoys for climate change and anti-Semitism.While the administration gave no details, Mick Mulvaney, director of the Office of Management and Budget, said foreign aid would be a top priority to cut.“The president said we're going to spend less money overseas and spend more of it here. That's going to be reflected with the number we send to the State Department,” Mulvaney said Monday.The State Department wouldn’t confirm any numbers, but acting spokesman Mark Toner said in a statement, “The Department is working with the White House and OMB to review its budget priorities ... [and] remains committed to a U.S. foreign policy that advances the security and prosperity of the American people."Secretary of State Rex Tillerson met with Trump at the White House on Monday, but it remains unclear how hard the former businessman will push back on proposed cuts. The budget for the State Department and foreign aid together totaled $50.1 billion last year.But the White House proposal drew a sharp response from even Republicans on the Hill.Sen. Graham blasted the idea, telling reporters it would not stand a chance in Congress.“This budget destroys soft power, it puts our diplomats at risk, and it's going nowhere,” he said Tuesday. “Clearly they don't understand how soft power is essential to winning the war.”Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., a foreign policy hawk like Graham, tweeted his opposition as well.“Foreign Aid is not charity. We must make sure it is well spent, but it is less than 1% of budget & critical to our national security,” the former Republican presidential candidate wrote.Over 120 retired senior military leaders also wrote a letter to Congress, urging it to save the State Department’s budget out of “our strong conviction that elevating and strengthening diplomacy and development alongside defense are critical to keeping America safe.”“Many of the crises our nation faces do not have military solutions alone,” they wrote, highlighting the foreign service’s non-military counter-terror tools and calling for “strong civilian partners in the battle against the drivers of extremism -- lack of opportunity, insecurity, injustice, and hopelessness.”They also cited foreign aid’s role in addressing other challenges, from efforts to prevent and contain epidemics like Ebola, to support for fragile but vital ally governments or the world’s 21 million refugees.“Now is not the time to retreat,” wrote the military leaders, including David Petraeus, the former top commander in Iraq and Afghanistan and CIA director. Most recently, he was considered for national security adviser, meeting with President Trump but ultimately withdrawing his name.The list also includes prominent leaders like former National Security Agency and Cyber Command chief Keith Alexander,
    Read more...