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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — With spring break fast approaching and summer vacation coming not long after, many families will soon be traveling by air or car.Good Housekeeping magazine's style director, Lori Bergamotto, appeared Tuesday on Good Morning America with hacks to make traveling easier and more efficient, whether you’re flying solo or with kids in tow.Good Housekeeping security line hacksPack toiletries efficiently: Use a small, clear bag to store travel-size versions of packs of face wipes; toothpaste and a toothbrush; shampoo and conditioner; razor; deodorant; body wash; sunscreen; and moisturizer.Skip the line: Obtaining TSA PreCheck ($85), which allows vetted passengers access to expedited security-screening, or CBP Global Entry ($100), which gives pre-approved travelers expedited entry upon arrival in the U.S., can help cut waiting time at security checkpoints. Both are valid for five years, making the price worth it if you travel even just a few times each year.Good Housekeeping's top luggage picksThe Biaggi Zipsa: This $70 piece of luggage folds to briefcase size for easy storage. You can also access the contents of the luggage from either its center, like a suitcase, or its top, like a backpack.The Ricardo Beverly Hills: This $150 bag is expandable so it allows for lots of storage. It also has a comfortable grip, is maneuverable and boasts a retractable strap to secure a second bag, according to Bergamotto.The Raden connected luggage: Bergamotto called this $295 bag innovative for its technology that allows you to view airport-security wait times with its app. You can also weigh the bag via its handle and charge your electronic devices with the bag's built-in battery.Good Housekeeping's packing hacksAn expert panel assembled by Good Housekeeping magazine recommends packing with the efficiency of a Boy Scout. Their tips include placing heavy items near the base of your luggage, packing clothes before shoes and accessories, bringing two small laundry bags and putting the outfit you plan to wear first at the top of your bag.Bonus travel hacksThe Good Housekeeping expert panel also advises traveling with a scarf to use for warmth or as a pillow, and bringing headphones to help cancel out travel sounds.To get cheaper airfares, experts recommend clearing cookies on your computer when searching for flights, setting alerts on sites like Expedia and Kayak to let you know when fares drop, and always looking at nonstop flights, which may not always be the most expensive option.To save money once you land, stop at a local grocery store to pick up food essentials so you will be less likely to splurge on meals at your hotel or by dining out. To get a taste of local cuisine at your destination, sites like Mealsharing.com and Eatwith.com allow you to sign up for home-cooked meals and classes with experienced cooks.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/ThinkstockIt's one of those questions the tax form asks you: Did you work abroad or receive income from a foreign source? If the answer is yes, tax attorney Janice Hayman says don't try to hide it. "The governments of all countries are all compliant now," she says. "So the information will be reported eventually. And you want to be the one to report it." The good news is if you worked abroad and paid taxes, you may be able to take a tax credit or deduction. This can reduce your taxes if both countries tax the same income. As for accounts you might hold in a foreign country: "If it's a non-interest bearing, or non-dividend bearing account, there really is no harm, because there is no taxable income," Hayman notes. She says it's just about reporting the information. And if you find out you had an account you haven't been claiming, go back and file the papers just to be compliant.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(HONG KONG) — A Hong Kong-based airline is set to launch a specially-crafted beer to enjoy at 35,000 feet, and they have high hopes it'll take off.According to Food & Wine, Cathay Pacific is about to introduce a new in-flight beverage, Betsy Beer -- a beer they say has the “ingredients, aroma and necessary carbonation to taste great both in the air and on the ground” so you can enjoy a refreshing beer while you fly.It's been proven that the way things tastes changes the higher the altitude, because of the effect the altitude has on our bodies.  Betsy Beer brewers claim theirs is the world’s first beer specifically designed to be enjoyed at high altitudes."We know that when you fly, your sense of taste changes. Airlines address this for food in certain ways. But nobody has ever tried to improve the taste of beer at altitude,” Cathay Pacific said in a statement.Betsy Beer is brewed by the Hong Kong Beer Co., and enlisted an “expert tasting panel” to develop the flavor.  It'll be available for first and business class passengers on Cathay Pacific flights between Hong Kong and the U.K. starting March 1.  It'll also be sold in airport lounges in Hong Kong and Heathrow airports.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Trader Joe's(NEW YORK) -- Trader Joe's is voluntarily recalling three kinds of unsweetened applesauce because of "the potential presence of glass pieces" in the food.On Sunday, the company listed the three products as: Trader Joe's First Crush Unsweetened Gravenstein Apple Sauce, barcode 00015905; Trader Joe's Organic Unsweetened Apple Sauce, barcode 00194877; and Trader Joe's All Natural Unsweetened Apple Sauce, barcode 00014359.It said the recall affected all codes of Trader Joe's First Crush Unsweetened Gravenstein Apple Sauce through "best before Aug. 8, 2018" in all Trader Joe's stores.All codes of Trader Joe's Organic Unsweetened Apple Sauce were affected through "best before Oct. 6, 2018" in all Trader Joe's stores.And Trader Joe's All Natural Unsweetened Apple Sauce codes were affected through "best before Dec. 16, 2018" in stores located in Alabama, Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Louisiana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Oregon, Texas, Utah and Washington.According to a Food and Drug Administration news release, the recall was initiated after Manzana Products Co., which makes the applesauce for Trader Joe's, said it had gotten reports from consumers saying they'd found glass in the products."All potentially affected products have been removed from store shelves and destroyed," Trader Joe's said in a news release on its website. "If you purchased any of these Unsweetened Apple Sauce products with the affected codes, please do not eat it. We urge you to discard the product or return it to any Trader Joe’s for a full refund."
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Wall Street finished slightly higher Monday with a 12th straight record close for the Dow Jones Industrial Average.The Dow gained 15.68 (+0.08 percent) to finish at 20,837.44.The Nasdaq jumped 16.59 (+0.28 percent) to close at 5,861.90, while the S&P 500 finished at 2,369.73, up 2.39 (+0.10 percent) from its open.Crude oil prices were flat at about $54 a barrel.President Trump: Investors await President Trump's address to Congress Tuesday night, where he is expected to talk about the Affordable Care Act and plans to overhaul the tax code. Stocks have rallied over the past few weeks as the president has discussed cutting back on regulations for businesses.Winners and Losers: Defense stocks, including Boeing and Lockheed Martin, performed well Monday after the White House announced a request for a $54 billion increase in military spending. Shares in Lockheed Martin climbed 2 percent and Boeing gained about 1 percent.Auction house Sotheby's beat quarterly earnings and revenue expectations, causing its stock to jump nearly 16 percent.After La La Land won several Oscars at the Academy Awards Sunday night, and was mistakenly named "Best Picture" before the Oscar was awared to Moonlight, Lions Gate Entertainment Corp. gave up less than 1 percent at the close.
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  • Courtesy Folkmanis(NEW YORK) -- While you were checking off wish list items for the little ones over the holidays, the toy experts were busy creating and planning new ways to keep children entertained.
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