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  • iStock/Thinkstock(WEST WINDSOR, N.J.) -- Almost 20 years after Pokémon came to North America, the franchise’s newest release is becoming an increasing concern for police.In an advisory issued Monday morning, a New Jersey police department warned citizens to keep their wits about them while playing Pokémon Go to avoid falling victim to criminals.“Please be aware of your surroundings and always use best practices for personal safety no matter where an app tells you to go,” West Windsor Police Lieutenant Garofalo wrote in the advisory. “That rare Pokémon may come at the cost of your car or possibly your life."Pokémon Go is a smartphone game in which users hunt for cartoon monsters from the popular TV and video game series. Players must travel to various (and often unfamiliar) real-world locations in order to progress. The game’s popularity has exploded since its release in the United States and several other countries last week.So far, Pokémon Go players throughout the country have stumbled upon a dead body, faced trespassing warnings and fallen victim to thieves.“I actually downloaded it myself, just to see what was going on,” Garofalo told ABC News in a phone interview. “I caught a Pokémon in the police station to get an idea of what these people are doing.”Garofalo said that he has had to warn officers that people who are seen acting bizarrely or wandering in strange locations may just be playing the game.“If someone is in the park late at night, this is probably the reason why,” he said. “They’re not necessarily trying to smoke or do anything illegal.”While he said is not worried about criminal incidents in his town, Garofalo advised Pokémon Go players to use common sense.“Don’t do anything that you normally would think is bad,” he said. “Normally you wouldn’t go to a deserted alley at 3 a.m. That shouldn’t change just because an app said you should.”
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  • Burberry(LONDON) -- Burberry Group PLC is replacing its chief executive after two years and its sending shares flying.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Bye bye Brexit losses. Wall Street is gaining on signs the U.S. economy is growing stronger after the latest employment report.
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  • Roberto Machado Noa/LightRocket via Getty Images(MINNEAPOLIS) -- Continental Mills is voluntarily recalling specific lots of blueberry pancake mix due to concerns that it could be contaminated with E. coli.The recall was spurred by an announcement by General Mills that it is expanding its voluntary recall of certain flour products after a multistate E.coli outbreak was linked to raw flour produced by the company.The family-owned Continental Mills, which is unaffiliated with General Mills, has used some of the flour products recalled by General Mills in certain blueberry pancake mixes, and the company announced in a statement Friday it is recalling specific lots of its Krusteaz Blueberry Pancake Mix manufactured between April 2016 and June 2016. In those specific lots, some of the mix "is made with a small percentage of affected flour which was recalled by General Mills because it may be contaminated with E. coli O121," Continental Mills said in a statement.Although the E.coli outbreak linked to General Mills flour products has sickened at least 42 people in 21 states, none of the reported illnesses has been linked to the pancake mix, according to Continental Mills.“The quality and safety of our products is of the utmost importance and we are doing everything possible to ensure our customers have all of the pertinent information,” Andy Heily, Continental Mills’ president, said in the company's statement.The pancake mixes being voluntarily recalled are: Krusteaz Blueberry Pancake Mix, 28 oz. carton, with a best-by date code between 3/30/2018 and 6/16/2018, and a UPC code 041449001289, and Krusteaz Blueberry Pancake Mix, a 3.5 lb. bag, with a best-by date code between of 4/27/2018 to 4/28/2018, and a UPC code 041449001487.Consumers are urged to throw away the product and contact Continental Mills for a refund at 1-800-457-7744. More information on the recall can be found here.General Mills has voluntarily recalled 30 million pounds of flour since the E. coli outbreak was reported in June by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.The products linked to the outbreak were sold under the names Gold Medal, Signature Kitchens, and Gold Medal Wondra. The specific lots recalled can be found at here.Of the at least 42 people infected with E. coli in the outbreak, 11 were hospitalized, according to the CDC.Flour produced at a General Mills facility in Kansas City, Missouri, is believed to be the source of the contamination, CDC officials said earlier this month. General Mills said that the FDA said that one sample from its recalled flour tested positive for E. coli O121.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The families of five American citizens injured or killed in attacks in Israel have filed a lawsuit against Facebook, claiming the social media giant is liable for providing a platform for Hamas, a U.S.-designated terrorist organization.“Facebook has knowingly provided material support and resources to Hamas in the form of Facebook’s online social network and communication services,” says the suit, filed Sunday in New York. “Hamas has used and relied on Facebook’s online social network platform and communications services as among its most important tools to facilitate and carry out its terrorist activity, including the terrorist attacks in which Hamas murdered and injured victims and their families in this case.“For years, Hamas, its leaders, spokesmen and members have openly maintained and used official Facebook accounts with little or no interference,” it adds.The suit was filed on behalf of families of five victims injured or killed in Israel, in incidents beginning with the kidnapping and killing of 16-year-old U.S. citizen Yaakov Naftali Fraenkel in June 2014 and ending with the March 2016 stabbing murder of 29-year-old Taylor Force, a U.S. Army veteran.The suit claims Facebook’s conduct was “intentional and malicious” and demands the court enter a judgment against Facebook for “compensatory damages” of at least $1 billion, in addition to punitive damages in amounts to be determined at trial.“For way too long, the social media companies have been allowed to believe that the anti-terrorism laws do not apply to them, that they have blanket immunity and they can do whatever they please,” said Nitsana Darshan-Leitner, an attorney for the plaintiffs. “Social media, however, has become a necessary component of international terrorism, the same as guns, explosives and money.”Representatives for Facebook did not immediately respond to ABC News’ requests for comment.The social networking giant is already facing a similar lawsuit filed by the family of a victim of the November 2015 attacks in Paris, which were carried out by the Syrian-based terrorist group ISIS.That suit, filed in June by the father of the late 23-year-old Nohemi Gonzalez, accuses Facebook, along with Google and Twitter, of “knowingly permitt[ing] the terrorist group ISIS to use their social networks as a tool for spreading extremist propaganda, raising funds and attracting new recruits.”At the time, Facebook said that suit was “without merit.”“There is no place for terrorists or content that promotes or supports terrorism on Facebook, and we work aggressively to remove such content as soon as we become aware of it,” the company said, according to a report by Quartz. “Anyone can report terrorist accounts or content to us, and our global team responds to these reports quickly around the clock. If we see evidence of a threat of imminent harm or a terror attack, we reach out to law enforcement.”Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Courtesy Ebbe Sweet(LONDON) — “If it takes poker for women to realize that they are stronger together, then let there be more poker,” entrepreneur Georgie Bernadete said, half-way through a recent game.Bernadete was one of 55 CEOs, entrepreneurs, artists and businesswomen from various industries invited to play at a women’s only poker tournament in London last month.The event was organized by Heidi Messer, a New York-based entrepreneur and investor who first launched the tournament in her Manhattan apartment a couple of years ago.Messer saw the power in the unspoken connection between powerful men in business -- created through golf, fraternities or sporting events -- and decided it was time for women to have the same.“It’s a social event,” Messer told ABC News, “similar to [the annual Allen & Co.] Sun Valley conference crossed with Bill Gates and Warren Buffett's bridge game.”“There are lots of women here that I’ve heard of but never met, so it’s nice to be spending some quality time together,” Sarah Shields, executive director and general manager at Dell U.K. sales, told ABC News.Poker is about calculated risks, and for Messer, like many others at the tournament, it's a metaphor for business. "If you don’t push yourself, test strategies, you won’t win, and you also have to learn a lot about your opponents," Messer said.Shields added: “Having something that's fun, that takes a little bit of skill, a little bit of luck and practicing the skills in business.”Players were given cheat sheets on how to play poker, along with a $130 initial buy-in. The prizes for the winners included a Hermes Birkin bag, a Baraboux bag and an Everpurse bag. All winnings were donated to Taproot Foundation, a nonprofit that connects similar social change organizations with skilled volunteers through pro bono service.Candidates for the next games are already being selected, for tournaments in New York and in Hong Kong.Little by little, organizer Messer hopes to share the idea that in return for participating in a powerful network, women will gain significantly in their careers."It's all about relationships, and women excel at that," Bernadete, co-founder of online shopping platform Orchard Mile, said. "It's about creating an ecosystem of people that inspire you and who you inspire."Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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