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  • DigitalVision/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) --  Travel can be costly, but there are some ways to save. Farecompare CEO Rick Seaney sat down with ABC News to share some of his best tips. Here's what he had to say: Who says there’s no free lunch? Anyone flying economy on a domestic flight, that’s who!Still, there are still some freebies and bargains for the coach-class crowd, including a few that may be new to you. I've broken it all down for you below. Free EntertainmentAmerican: The airline just announced free movies and TV for coach fliers, which can be viewed on phones or tablets or on seat-back screens (only about a third of the airline’s fleet have such things though more are being added each month). Looks like there are shows for everyone, from episodes of "Game of Thrones" to movies like "Captain America: Civil War."Delta: This carrier actually jumped on the free-entertainment bandwagon first with an announcement back in June and they too offer #GOT.United: There are some free entertainment options on certain United aircraft, and darned if they don’t include "Game of Thrones" as well. One difference: United is concerned enough about the exposure of youngsters to on-screen carnage that it has asked travelers to “try to make sure that any children seated near you aren’t able to see scenes with violence or adult theme.”Free Food and FunUnited and Delta: OK, so they aren’t meals, but you do get a certain "je ne sais quoi" feeling with freebies like United’s stroopwafel (a waffle-shaped confection filled with caramel) and Delta’s buttery Biscoff bites (more than 1.5 billion consumed). I like them both, and others seem to enjoy them. But does anyone turn down free cookies?Virgin America: You’ll have to pay for your meal on this airline, but you can get it whenever you want, thanks to the airline’s touchscreen Seat-to-Seat Delivery + Chat service. Where does chat come in? As the airline puts it, you can use the screen to “debrief with co-workers in other rows, mingle in a chat room or flirt with someone you saw in the gate area, you know the one.”Free Useful StuffSouthwest’s big bags: The only U.S. airline that allows passengers to check any bags for free offers the freebie for not one, but two pieces of luggage. You wonder how long this will last, though. The airline gives up a lot of fee-money for this passenger amenity, and besides, people who fly Southwest frequently tell me more and more of its passengers are forsaking the freebies in favor of convenient carry-ons.Spirit’s tiny bag: It may not hold everything, but it’s free, and Spirit claims you can fit plenty in what it calls a "personal item," as long as the bag is no larger than a backpack or large purse. Caution: If the bag doesn’t fit under the seat, you will have to pay.From The Bargain BinTSA PreCheck: Pay $85 and you get through security faster for the next five years, plus your kids 12 and under get the benefit too at no additional cost. I highly recommend this and consider it a real bargain.Perks For Your PainAlaska: If your checked bag doesn’t make it to the carousel within 20 minutes of your arrival, the airline will give you a discount code good for $25 off your next Alaska flight (or you can choose 2,500 bonus miles). As far as I can tell, it’s the only airline that makes any kind of gesture like this, and it’s a good one. When was the last time an airline told you, “We’re sorry”?All airlines: Baggage refunds are coming for late luggage (you know, ‘temporarily misplaced’). The new FAA Extension, Safety, and Security Act of 2016 requires airlines to automatically refund baggage fees if a suitcase arrives 12 hours or more late after a domestic flight or 18 hours late for international.Delta and Southwest: Both airlines had systemwide computer failures within the past few weeks that rocked their flight schedules
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  • Courtesy of Kevin Upshur (PHILADELPHIA) -- For some Philadelphia youth, their after-school home was once a bar.When Kevin Upshur's mother passed away 10 yeas ago, he decided to transform his once family-owned bar into the Strawberry Mansion Learning Center, a safe haven for the children of his Philadelphia community.The center provides children with books, unlimited computer access, healthy meals and the opportunity to be mentored by the center's volunteers."My mom had asked me to work and take care of some young people because of all the violence in the community," Upshur told ABC News. Now, by providing resources and a safe space for the children, the social worker is doing just that.The not-for-profit is open to all children in the community, so long as their parents are willing to stop by and sign them up. There are up to 25 kids in the center on any given day, according to Upshur, including some former mentees in college who now return to the Learning Center to study long hours -- sometimes overnight -- for their exams."[The kids] kind of really flop down when they come in and they feel good about being there," Upshur said of the comfortable environment he aims to provide for the children. The center also takes its children on field trips and frequently collaborates with local charities.Upshur said he especially prioritizes reading and educating the children on history and African-American studies."We see them grow and mature in a way where they become more conscious about who they are and what they need to do," Upshur said. "And that’s one of the most rewarding things that I get."The center relies on donations and fundraisers, such as fish fries and an upcoming skating party, to stay afloat. Funding often presents a challenge for Upshur, who is looking to replace old computers and add a TV so that the children have an opportunity to watch the news and other channels they may not have access to at home.Despite these obstacles, Upshur hopes to expand the space and make it a permanent institution that can serve Strawberry Mansion's generations to come."I sit there sometimes and it brings tears to my eyes to see what has happened and what it has become," he said. "It's about people coming together to make a difference."Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Wall Street ended the week with modest gains on Friday, as the Nasdaq posted a record high.The Dow lost 37.05 (-0.20 percent) to finish at 18,576.47.The Nasdaq gained 4.50 (+0.09 percent) to close at 5,232.89, htting a record. The S&P 500 finished at 2,184.05, down 1.74 (-0.20 percent) from its open.Crude oil rose just over 1 percent with prices hitting over $44 a barrel.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Two employees of Delta Air Lines apparently confused the state of New Mexico for the country of Mexico in an email exchange with a customer from Santa Fe.The customer, 73-year-old Jack Sullivan, told ABC News today that the apparent mix-up happened after he made reservations with Delta for a flight from Albuquerque to Pennsylvania to visit family.A few days after booking his flight, Sullivan said he noticed cheaper tickets on Delta's website, so he emailed Delta to find out what the change fee would be.The 73-year-old said he received replies from two different agents, both of whom wrote that they could not quote any figures on the internet for international travel and referred him to Delta's office in Mexico."I wrote back and said that I was aware New Mexico was fairly late in joining the Union in '47, but since we've been in the Union for 104 years, I think that gives us a little bit seniority," Sullivan said with a laugh.He eventually learned that the change fee would be $400, so he didn't end up changing his flight.A Delta spokesperson told ABC News today, "We appreciate this customer's patience in the handling of his reservation request and will follow up with our reservations team."Sullivan said he just hopes "the pilot knows where Albuquerque is" when he flies back home from his trip."I don't want to end up lost in Mexico," he said with a laugh.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Ferrari(FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla.) -- Many Americans would be more than satisfied to own one Ferrari.Not Preston Henn.The 85-year-old Florida resident, owner of the giant Swap Shop flea market and tourist attraction in Fort Lauderdale, boasts a collection of 15 Ferraris, worth an estimated $100 million, that would make any car collector drool. His fleet includes the ultra-exclusive Ferrari FXX and the 1964 Ferrari 275 GTB/C Speciale, of which only three were built.Henn wants another Ferrari to add to his enviable trove -- the soon-to-be unveiled, open-top version of the LaFerrari supercar. This new model, which enthusiasts are dubbing the LaFerrari Spider, will make its official debut in October at the Paris International Motor Show.But a Ferrari spokesperson told ABC News that "all available examples have already been sold after a special preview to clients."Auto blogs are reporting that just 150 units of the new model will be produced for a selling price of $1.7 million each. Ferrari would not confirm those numbers nor the car’s name. Ferrari is also reportedly selling the car by invitation only.Ferrari apparently rejected Henn’s attempt to place an order for the luxury automaker's new sports car.Henn responded with a lawsuit against Ferrari, claiming that it “injured Henn’s reputation in his profession, trade, occupation, and in the world of high end automobile organizations, associations, and exhibitions and their individual participants” by deciding that he was “not qualified” to purchase the car. Henn is seeking $75,000 in damages plus compensation for other costs and fees in the lawsuit filed July 29 in the southern Florida U.S. District Court.According to the lawsuit, Henn already owns a different and earlier version of the car, a hard-top LaFerrari, and has been an avid Ferrari collector for nearly 60 years.Henn, a self-described “Ferrarista,” asked his Ferrari dealer earlier this summer to place an order for the new LaFerrari model, the lawsuit states. The dealership's owner later notified Henn that Ferrari North America officials said the company would not sell the car to Henn, according to the lawsuit.Henn wrote a letter to Sergio Marchionne, the CEO of Fiat Chrysler and chairman and CEO of Ferrari N.V., to plead his case and included a check for $1 million as a deposit on the new model, the lawsuit states. Enrico Galleria, Ferrari’s chief marketing and commercial officer,responded in writing that “all units have been sold” and asked Henn “not to send any of those check [sic] directly to Ferrari or our manager,” the lawsuit said. Henn’s check was returned.According to the lawsuit, Henn was informed by his "friends in the Ferrari world" that Ferrari officials had said he was “not qualified” to purchase the car.Bruce Rogow, Henn’s attorney, told ABC News that his client also spoke by phone to a Ferrari representative prior to the lawsuit. Henn was again told he was not “not qualified” to make the purchase, Rogow said. No reason was given, he noted.A Ferrari spokesperson declined to comment on the lawsuit, telling ABC News in an email that “we never comment on legal proceedings/complaints filed or to be filed with Ferrari.”
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  • Drew Angerer/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Just weeks after the departure of Roger Ailes, Rupert Murdoch has announce leadership changes at Fox News and its sister channel, Fox Business Network.
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