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  • Samsung(PHOENIX) — A student at Arizona State University described his experience with an overheating cellphone, as questions arise about incidents involving Samsung devices not covered in its recall of the Galaxy Note7.Lakshman Patel told KNXV-TV, a local ABC affiliate, he was writing an essay for class when all of a sudden he noticed something unusual."It was honestly the most freaky accident ever,” Patel said."I hear sizzling first and then I smelled burning. I thought it was my computer at first but then a second after the intense burning sensation just hits my thigh."Smoke was also rising into his face, Patel told KNXV-TV. That's when he realized the burn was coming from his Samsung Galaxy S6 Active."I tried to get my pants off as fast as I could,” Patel said. “The next thing I knew my pants and my phone was on the floor and my room was filled with smoke."Samsung told KNXV-TV, "We are in contact with Mr. Patel, are conducting a thorough investigation into his case, and are doing everything we can to help him." Patel confirmed to KNXV-TV the company is working with him.His incident comes after various reports have surfaced, including a 6-year-old Brooklyn boy who reportedly suffered burns from a Samsung S4, a woman in the UK who said her Samsung Galaxy S7 melted, a Samsung Galaxy S6 Active that allegedly exploded in Massachusetts, and a Florida man who claims his Samsung Galaxy S7 started a fire in his car.In addition, a California man filed suit last week against Samsung, claiming a Galaxy S7 Edge badly burned his right leg when it burst into flames in late May.A Samsung spokesperson issued a blanket response to the reports of various devices causing problems.“Recent reports suggesting Samsung’s battery issue goes beyond the Galaxy Note7 are not true," the spokesperson told ABC News. "The battery cell issue announced earlier this month is isolated to one battery manufacturer for one specific phone model."Samsung has sold millions of Galaxy mobile devices in the U.S. without incident. In extremely rare cases, there have been reports of overheating in other devices. In nearly all of these cases, these reports have been attributed to external circumstances and have not been related to product quality." Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Courtesy Woof Washer(NEW YORK) -- Products advertised on TV are often promised as ways to streamline your daily routine, but how well do they work in real life?ABC News' Good Morning America tried out “As Seen on TV” products on live TV for a special series called “Buy It and Try It.”GMA used two products designed for pets: Woof Washer 360 and True Touch Grooming Gloves. Read below to see how well the two products worked:Woof Washer 360Use: "Woof Washer 360 lets dogs of all sizes get 360 degrees of clean."How It Fared Live:ABC News' Gio Benitez said he saw that soap "seemed to be falling off" the dog he washed using the Woof Washer but "not everywhere."ABC News' Becky Worley used the Woof Washer on a longer-haired dog."I feel like I still have to kind of get in there and dig my hand around to get him," she said. "It does do a good job getting underneath the dog."Jack Haanraadts, a Woof Washer representative, said the dog washed by Worley seemed to be "really enjoying the massaging jets" of the Woof Washer."The adjustable arc definitely helps too. You can get the increased maneuverability," he said. "You can really get under and get the undercoat and get all the dirt out from underneath."True Touch Grooming GlovesUse: "Your pet will enjoy a relaxing massage while the over 175 soft silicone grooming tips reach deep down to loosen and lift away hair, dirt and debris from under and off their coat like a magnet. Plus, the flexible grooming tips massage and stimulate the skin for a shiny, healthy top coat."How It Fared Live:"What animal doesn’t like being petted," said Worley, who used the glove on a longer-haired dog. "I can really see this because some animals are skittish about the brush and being groomed.""But I’ve been brushing Roger here for a little bit and the one thing I’m noticing is you can kind of peel this hair out but I’m not getting a ton of hair right now," she added.Worley asked a representative from the maker of True Touch Grooming Gloves if a glove is less efficient than a brush when grooming longer-haired dogs.“Actually I think it’s much more efficient,” said Teresa Sinapi, brand manager for AllStar Products Group. “And it has silicone, which massages your pet, making them much more comfortable.”GMA co-anchor Michael Strahan used a True Touch Grooming Glove on a cat."The animals look very comfortable,” he said. “They’re not minding it at all so I think it’s a success, actually.”
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  • KevinAlexanderGeorge/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- The FBI and federal prosecutors in New York and California have opened an investigation intoWells Fargo days after the bank was fined $185 million dollars for alleged misconduct, according to an official briefed on the investigation.Further details were not immediately available.The bank is not commenting on the news, which follows allegations last week that hundreds of thousands of unauthorized deposit accounts and credit cards had been opened or applied for between May 2011 and July 2015 without customers' permission. Some 5,300 employees were fired as a result.While the investigation is in its early stages, it opens the possibility of criminal charges.The allegations came to light when the bank was slapped with a $100 million fine from theConsumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), a federal watchdog, on Sept. 8. It was also hit with fines from the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency for $35 million and the County and City of Los Angeles for another $50 million.The bank said in a statement at the time that it takes responsibility "for any instances where customers may have received a product that they did not request." Bank officials have also said that they believe all affected customers have been refunded, and sought to downplay the terminations saying that they represented only about one percent of their workforce. Total refunds, the bank said last week, amounted to about $2.6 million.A portion of the unauthorized deposit accounts generated about $2 million in fees, while a chunk of the credit card accounts generated about $400,000 in fees, according to a CFPB document reviewed by ABC News.Since then criticism has mounted.In damage control mode, bank CEO John Stumpf appeared on CNBC Tuesday night before the criminal probe was revealed, where he said that he held himself accountable for the alleged misconduct but said that he did not plan to resign."I think the best thing I can do right now is lead this company," Stumpf said.The Los Angeles city attorney said employees were opening and funding accounts without customers' permission or knowledge in order to "satisfy sales goals and earn financial rewards under the bank's incentive-compensation program."The bank announced yesterday that by Jan. 1, 2017 it would stop imposing those sales goals on employees. Asked why the goals program wouldn't end immediately, a bank spokesperson told ABC News that it would spend the intervening months to ensure "team members receive fair compensation through the transition."Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • solar22/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Two women filed a class action lawsuit against L’Oreal on Wednesday alleging that a hair relaxer produced by the company left them with burns and bald spots on their scalp. The lawsuit claims that the product includes harsh chemicals, despite the packaging focused on “AMLA oil” and claims that the relaxer includes no Lye and is safer than other products. The lawsuit says that the defendants were aware of the ingredients listed on the package but that the marketing of the product indicated that it would be gentler than it actually was.One of the plaintiffs said the product burned her scalp when she used it and left her with bald spots and scabs, forcing her to wear a wig. The lawsuit also cites multiple reviews and complaints online describing similar experiences. This particular line of products has been endorsed by stars like Tracee Ellis Ross and referenced Michelle Obama in ad campaigns through her hairstylist. The regulation of cosmetics has been an ongoing issue on Capitol Hill with multiple bills introduced to give the FDA more authority to regulate chemicals in beauty products. L’Oreal has endorsed a bill introduced by Sen. Dianne Feinstein that would give the FDA regulatory authority.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Vladimiroquai/iStock/Thinkstock(PITTSBURGH) – Wednesday’s announcement that Uber has introduced a new fleet of “self-driving” cars to shuttle passengers around Pittsburgh may have consumers wondering exactly what that means.However, not all "self-driving" cars are the same -- the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration classifies vehicle autonomy into five categories, ranging from Level 0 to Level 4.If you've used a car, your vehicle is probably between Levels 0 and 2.According to the NHTSA, drivers of Level 0 cars have “complete and sole control of the primary vehicle controls -- brake, steering, throttle, and motive power -- at all times.”Level 0 cars are the most basic on the road, with nothing like cruise control or assisted braking.The next level up, includes cars with “one or more specific control functions,” according to the NHTSA. This can include things like stability control or pre-charged brakes, which provide some assistance to drivers.Level 2 cars have “at least two primary control functions,” that are autonomous, which according to the NHTSA, include things like adaptive cruise control -- cruise control systems that, through sensors, maintain a safe distances from other vehicles.While Level 2 may sound run-of-the-mill, much of the buzzworthy work in self-driving vehicles is still happening at Level 2.Tesla’s “AutoPilot” systems, which allow certain models to maintain or even switch lanes and control and adjust speed based on the presence of other cars, is Level 2.Then there is Level 3, which is the level that Uber’s Pittsburgh cars are operating at.According to the NHTSA, Level 3 vehicles “enable the driver to cede full control of all safety-critical functions under certain traffic or environmental conditions,” while the driver is still “expected to be available for occasional control, but with sufficiently comfortable transition time.”Level 4, the highest level, is probably what most people think of when it comes to self-driving cars.While Level 4 autonomous vehicles expect a human to input a destination, humans are not “expected to be available for control at any time during the trip.” Level 4 vehicles could also be operated without drivers, according to the NHTSA.There are other classifications for self-driving cars. SAE International, a society of engineers, has its own 6-level ranking system. However, both Tesla and Uber user the NHTSA's system in discussing their vehicles.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • robertcicchetti/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) – Wall Street finished a wild day ahead of a Federal Reserve meeting next week.The Dow closed down 31.98 (-0.18%) to finish at 18,034, its lowest close since July.The NASDAQ rose 18.52 (0.36%) to close at 5,173 and the S&P finished the session down 1.25 (-0.06%) to end at 2,125.The Federal Reserve meets next week and could announce it's raising interest rates for the second time in less than a year. A mega corporate merger is underway.  Bayer's offered to buy Monsanto for $66 billion. It's the largest cash bid for a company in history, and the biggest takeover this year. The combined company would control more than a quarter of the world's seed and pesticide market.  Ford is shifting all of its small car production to a new $1.6 billion assembly plant south of the border to Mexico.UPS says it's going to hire 95,000 seasonal workers this year, 5,000 more than 2015. Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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