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  • Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- A new update to the popular social networking app Snapchat that allows certain users of the app to track down your exact location is raising privacy concerns for parents and child safety advocates.The new Snapchat feature, called "Snap Map," lets you decide whether or not to share your location with your friends in the app, or stay in "ghost mode," the app's default setting. If you decide to share your location, then an emoji representing you will appear to pinpoint your exact location on a map to your friends within the Snapchat app. The emoji marking where someone is on the map will "only update when you open Snapchat," the tech company explained in a blog post.But experts are concerned."It is very easy to accidentally share everything that you've got with more people than you need too, and that's the scariest portion," cyber security expert Charles Tendell told ABC News of the Snapchat update.A spokesperson for Snapchat told ABC News in a statement that the "safety of our community is very important to us and we want to make sure that all Snapchatters, parents and educators have accurate information about how the Snap Map works.""With Snap Map, location-sharing is off by default for all users and is completely optional. Snapchatters can choose exactly who they want to share their location with, if at all, and can change that setting at any time," the spokesperson said. "It's also not possible to share your location with someone who isn't already your friend on Snapchat, and the majority of interactions on Snapchat take place between close friends."Experts recommend that parents stay up to date on what updates to apps like Snapchat mean for both them and their kids. Experts also suggest parents make sure they know who their kids' friends are on Snapchat and also talk to their children about who they add on Snapchat and being selective about what the word "friend" means.Childnet International, an children's internet safety advocacy group, released tips for how to safely use the Snap Map feature, which includes to only share your location with people you know in person, and never with strangers. In addition, the group advises to not add contacts to Snapchat if you don't already know them in person.The organization also advises that you can switch off the location-sharing feature at any time, and to put careful consideration into when you choose to share your location."Think about where you’re sharing your location. Location services such as Snap Maps can lead people to your house," Childnet International said in a blog post. "Think about what times you’re on the app and whether these are locations you want to share-–if not, then turn this off within your settings."
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- While there's nothing like feeling your toes in the sand or grass in the summer, it's a bit of a drag to have to carry your flip flops around after using them to save your soles from that scorching parking lot. However, an ingenious new gadget has the solution in pocket: The Sandal Huuk is a colorful little clip that slips onto your beach bag, chair, pocket or waistband, allowing you to carry your sandals or other lightweight items hands-free. The invention was created by a father and son after they lugged around items during a family trip to Daytona Beach. Their motto? "Hold hands, not flip flops."The Sandal Huuk is now available in a four pack for $20 on Amazon.
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  • KAZUHIRO NOGI/AFP/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Takata Corp. filed for bankruptcy protection in the U.S. and Japan on Sunday.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Flying can be costly, especially for those who don't do it often. FareCompare CEO Rick Seaney sat down with ABC News to tell us what infrequent fliers need to know before they book a flight.Here's what he had to say:Some people fly frequently for work, but more of us are what you could call leisure travelers who might fly one summer, drive the next.Traveling by plane only sporadically can leave gaps in our knowledge because the air-travel industry changes its rules and practices often.A few years ago, for instance, getting free meals when flying coach was the norm. Then that perk disappeared. Now it’s making a comeback.Here are some other things infrequent travelers may need to know.1. Get to the airport early.Rushing to the gate with seconds to spare is a thing of the past. These days, airlines have added incentive to take off and arrive on time because the government publishes these statistics for the world to see; as a result, airlines like Delta suggest domestic passengers arrive at the airport two hours early, check in 30 minutes before departure and be at the gate at least 15 minutes before takeoff. Why? Because sometimes planes leave early, and if you’re not there, they’re not going to wait for you.Suggestion: Don’t be late. You could get stuck with a $200 ticket-change fee.2. Checking bags usually costsFree checked bags: Southwest is the only U.S. airline that will still check bags for free.Free carry-on bags: Most of the big airlines offer this, with the exception of travelers flying on basic economy fares on American and United. Smaller airlines including Allegiant, Frontier and Spirit generally charge fees for all luggage.Suggestion: Use a carry-on even if you have to pay for it because the bag that travels by your side is a bag that won’t go missing.3. Forget about refundsExcept in very rare cases, once you buy your ticket, there’s no changing your mind because the cheapest tickets are almost always nonrefundable. Be very sure of your travel dates before you book.Suggestion: If you must change your mind about a trip, do so within 24 hours of ticket purchase; by law, changes within this grace period are free.4. Pay-to-pick seatsThis is increasingly common, and you’ll see it on nearly every airline: You buy a ticket, go to pick your seat and find that the only free seats are middle seats way in the back. If you want a seat next to an aisle, window or not directly across from a restroom, you may have to pay a fee for it. On some discount airlines, you get no choice at all; if you don’t pay the fee, you will be randomly assigned a seat and should not expect much.Suggestion: These pick-your-seat fees can change as the departure date gets closer, so keep checking back to see if you can get a better deal.5. Freebies, what freebies?Meals in economy are making a comeback, but don’t get too excited because they are offered on only a few routes of a few airlines. As for blankets and pillows, those airlines that still offer these amenities will make you pay for it. The availability of entertainment options is all over the map, but some airlines are phasing out seat-back screens because so many travelers bring their own electronic devices. Be sure you have your device.Suggestion: Save money, bring a lunch from home, take a warm jacket, and carry headphones or ear buds for your device. And keep your charger handy.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Donaldson Collection/Getty Images(CAMBRIDGE, Mass.) -- Capone's watch as well as a musical composition he handwrote behind bars in Alcatraz were among the items up for bid in the "Gangsters, Outlaws and Lawmen" auction by RR Auction, an auction house headquartered in Boston.Capone, who was born to Italian immigrants in New York City, headed a Chicago-based crime empire during the Prohibition era that raked in millions of dollars through bootlegging, gambling, racketeering and other illicit activities. He was dubbed Scarface by the press after his face was slashed during a fight, a nickname he apparently disliked."Unlike his more maligned moniker of ‘Scarface,’ Capone preferred that those closest to him call him by ‘Snorky,’ a slang term which meant ‘sharp’ or ‘well-dressed,'" according to a description accompanying Capone's watch on RR Auction's website.According to the auction house, the rounded triangular pocket watch was personally owned and used by Capone. The timepiece is on its original chain made of 14-karat white gold. The exterior of the case features 23 diamonds shaped to form Capone's initials, "AC," which are encircled by 26 additional diamonds. Another 72 diamonds circle the watch's platinum face and gold-tone impressed numerals.Online bids for Capone's watch had surpassed $17,000 prior to the live auction Saturday afternoon. Experts estimated the item would sell for more than $25,000, according to RR Auction.A musical piece entitled "Humoresque," written in pencil by Capone when he was incarcerated in Alcatraz in the 1930s, was also up for grabs. The musical manuscript shows Capone's softer side, containing the lines: "You thrill and fill this heart of mine, with gladness like a soothing symphony, over the air, you gently float, and in my soul, you strike a note."Experts estimated the sheet will sell for over $20,000, according to RR auction. it went for $18,750.Also up for auction Saturday was a letter written by gangster boss John Gotti, two life-size death masks of gangster John Dillinger, a brick from the scene of the 1929 St. Valentine’s Day Massacre, and jewelry that belonged to infamous crime duo Bonnie and Clyde.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Erin Moore(NEW YORK) -- Weddings usually include something old, something new, something borrowed and something blue -- but for one bride, there was something funny, too.Bride Andria Farthing asked her cousin, Patrick Casey, to take on a unique role in her wedding to earlier this month."They've been together a while and I started lobbying to be the flower man before they were even engaged," Patrick Casey told ABC News. "They loved the idea, and I was beyond excited they said yes once they were officially engaged.""I think every good marriage has a little laughter in it," Casey said, explaining that he "decided to have some fun with it."He said Andria and the groom, Jake, "fully approved and encouraged" him to embrace the role with gusto.As Casey made his way up the aisle, he tossed every last petal out of his tiny basket, even pulling some extra ones from random coat pockets."I forgot to use the petals I stuffed in my shoe though," Casey laughed.This wasn't the first time the cousins were in a wedding party together.Twenty years ago, the pair walked down the aisle together as ring bearer and flower girl, so Farthing had Casey carry the very same basket at her ceremony on June 17."When I was about five and she was about three, we were in my mom's brother's wedding," Casey explained. "I think her mom was the one who still had the basket."Casey, who is from Appleton, Wisconsin, fully embraced the non-traditional role of "flower man" even after the ceremony was over."I saved a couple petals and would randomly throw them on people during the reception," Casey said.
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