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  • Chesnot/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Facebook has taken the lion's share of scrutiny from Congress and the media for its data-handling practices that allow savvy marketers and political agents to target specific audiences, but it's far from alone.
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  • WPVI-TV(NEW YORK) -- The Federal Aviation Administration issued an emergency order on Friday for airlines to inspect engines like the one involved in Tuesday's fatal incident involving Southwest Airlines Flight 1380, according to an FAA spokesperson.Engines with more 30,000 total takeoffs and landings must be inspected within 20 days.CFM International, the maker of the engines subject to the order, estimated 352 engines in the U.S. are affected and 681 worldwide.The inspections will focus on the fan blades, the FAA said. The National Transportation Safety Board said an engine fan blade on Flight 1380 suffered metal fatigue before breaking.The woman who died was sitting over the wing on the Boeing 737 when the engine failed and she was partially sucked out a broken window. Fellow passengers pulled the woman back in and attempted to revive her.She later died.Southwest already announced it was starting an “accelerated inspection” of its fleet after the deadly failure, and other airlines have announced their own inspection plans. American Airlines said it started additional inspections of its 737s before Tuesday's accident, while the directive was being debated.In a letter to passengers obtained by ABC News, Southwest offered sincere apologies as well as a $5,000 check and the promise of a $1,000 travel voucher. The letter also states that the airline’s primary focus now is to assist the passengers who were aboard the flight in every way possible.A Southwest Airlines official confirmed to ABC News that the letters were sent by the airline, but would not comment on the monetary compensation.The NTSB investigation is expected to take 12 to 15 months.
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  • Charley Gallay/Getty Images for TWC(NEW YORK) -- Harvey Weinstein asked a federal bankruptcy court Friday to force The Weinstein Company to give him access to his email accounts and personal files.Without them, Weinstein said in court documents obtained by ABC News, he cannot “exonerate himself.”Weinstein made “multiple requests” for these emails and for his personal files but TWC either refused or imposed “incredulous conditions,” according to court documents.“[TWC’s] continued refusal to permit Mr. Weinstein to access these emails has significantly impinged his ability to effectively defend himself,” his attorney Scott Cousins wrote.Weinstein conceded in court documents he is under criminal investigation in New York, Los Angeles and London, and is the subject of pending and threatened civil litigation, all involving allegations of rampant sexual misconduct first detailed publicly by The New York Times and The New Yorker.“By denying him access to potentially exculpatory emails, [TWC is] depriving Mr. Weinstein of his due process rights and preventing him from properly defending against these allegations,” Cousins wrote.The Weinstein Company filed for bankruptcy after an attempt to sell the company to a group of investors that wanted to reconstitute it as a female-led studio failed.Weinstein said the company has an interest in his “narrowly tailored request” since any successful civil lawsuit could devalue the remaining assets. If TWC does not grant access and Weinstein cannot use his emails to help refute factual allegations, Weinstein said it would be “to the detriment” of the estate and creditors.Since last year, Weinstein, 65, has been accused by dozens of women of sexual misconduct, with several alleging sexual assault. Weinstein has denied all allegations of non-consensual sex. He is currently facing criminal investigations in several jurisdictions, as well as multiple lawsuits.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Some of the nation's wealthiest donors are writing multimillion-dollar checks to support candidates during this midterm season in high stakes contests across the country.While it's not unusual for uber-wealthy donors to gild the coffers of preferred candidates, the roster of rich donors often offers a glimpse of who is playing the role of kingmaker in elections and, sometimes, who might be interested in ensuring that their political interests are heard. By the end of 2014, just five donors poured nearly $135 million into federal elections, according to an analysis of Federal Election Commission data by the Center for Responsive Politics.So far this election cycle, 17 megadonors have given more than $100 million to candidates, party committees, super PACs, and outside groups. And six people have spent nearly more than $67 million so far this cycle in the battle to control Congress.Here are the top six contributors thus far.1. Richard Uihlein: $25.3 millionThe single biggest donor this election cycle, Richard “Dick” Uihlein, has quickly become a GOP power player in the past couple of years.He and his wife Liz Uihlein, co-founders of Wisconsin-based shipping company Uline, together donated more than $25 million already so far this election cycle.Uihlein’s biggest focus so far this cycle has been on supporting Republican Kevin Nicholson's bid to unseat Democratic incumbent Sen. Tammy Baldwin in the Wisconsin Senate race. He is involved in almost every single one of the top spending super PACs supporting Nicholson.Pretty early on in the election cycle, Uihlein dropped seven-figure checks totaling $3.5 million to a single-candidate super PAC operating exclusively in support of Nicholson called Solutions for Wisconsin. Two of the biggest spenders in the race, Americas PAC and Restoration PAC, are also almost exclusively funded by Uihlein.Outside groups funded by Uihlein together have spent more than $6.1 million in the Wisconsin Senate race so far this year and pro-Baldwin groups have ramped up their spending to try and compete.The face-off has resulted in a pricey contest that has attracted the largest amount of spending from outside groups. The Wisconsin race has already seen nearly $10 million in outside money.2. Tom Steyer: $16 millionCalifornia billionaire Tom Steyer, who topped individual contributions two consecutive election cycles in a row, is leading the charge from the Democratic side again.So far this election cycle, Tom Steyer and his wife Kathryn Steyer together have donated nearly $16 million, and the number is expected to only go up. A leading voice in the “impeach Trump now” movement, Tom Steyer has pledged to pour an additional $30 million to flipping the lower chamber to a Democratic majority.Steyer has been active in donating money directly to campaigns, but the vast majority of his big checks have gone to NextGen Climate Action, a super PAC he set up to push forward his political and environmentalist agendas. NextGen Climate Action has been active in organizing its own issue campaigns as well as donating to other liberal groups.3. George Soros: $7.7 millionGeorge Soros, a business magnate, and a long-time Democratic contributor recently started ramping up his political spending. He dropped a $3 million check in late March to a newly formed super PAC called Win Justice, which has not reported any activities as of yet.He is the sole contributor to the super PAC so far.He has also given millions to groups tied to the Democratic Party, including $1 million to the Senate Majority PAC and $380,000 to the American Bridge 21st Century. National Democratic Party committees also received a total of $537,100 from Soros.George Soros' son, Alexander George Soros, has been following his father's steps to as a big contributor for the Democrats. He recently dropped a $2 million check to the Senate Majority PAC, and also has donated a total of $135,600 to the Democratic
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Wall Street closed in the red on Friday as technology stocks suffered from Apple's sliding shares.The Dow Jones Industrial Average slipped 201.95 (-0.82 percent) to finish the session at 24,462.94.The Nasdaq sunk 91.93 (-1.27 percent) to close at 7,146.13, while the S&P 500 finished trading at 2,670.14, down 22.99 (-0.85 percent) for the day.Crude oil prices remained flat at over $68 per barrel.Winners and Losers: Shares of Apple tumbled 4.10 percent, dragging the tech-heavy Nasdaq lower. Morgan Stanley lowered the stock's price target, predicting weaker iPhone sales this summer.General Electric's quarterly earnings topped investors' expectations and its stock climbed 3.93 percent.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- One of the nation’s most iconic urban spaces is kicking out cars.For a trial period that starts in June, vehicles will no longer be allowed to drive through New York’s Central Park, save for cross-town transverses at 97th, 86th, 79th and 65th Streets.“This park was not built for automobiles. It was built before there were automobiles,” New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said Friday.Cars have been allowed on a loop drive shared with pedestrians and cyclists south of 72nd Street during certain hours. Loop drives above 72nd Street were closed to vehicular traffic permanently in 2015.“For more than a century, cars have turned parts of the world’s most iconic park into a highway. Today we take it back,” de Blasio said.Central Park without cars, the Parks Department said, would be cleaner and safer.“Central Park is not just one of New York’s favorite parks – it’s one of the most-beloved, most-recognized parks in the entire world,” said Parks Commissioner Mitchell J. Silver. “Now, we’re making history by demonstrating just how clean, accessible, and safe an urban park can be.”
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