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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Although the Dow Jones Industrial Average closed flat, U.S. stocks finished mostly higher on Friday with energy companies rebounding from earlier this week.The Dow Jones slid 2.53 (-0.01 percent) to finish at 21,394.76.The Nasdaq jumped 28.56 (+0.46 percent) to close at 6,265.25, while the S&P 500 finished at 2,438.30, up 3.80 (+0.16 percent) from its open.Crude oil was about 1 percent higher with prices at $43 per barrel.Winners and Losers:  An earnings miss for Bed Bath & Beyond sent shares plunging 12 percent.Barnes & Noble climbed 8 percent after reporting a narrower-than-expected loss in its fiscal fourth quarter.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(AUSTIN, Texas) -- A Texas police officer has filed a lawsuit against Ford Motor Company, claiming that his squad car literally made him sick. Austin Police Sgt. Zachary LaHood was issued a 2011 Ford Explorer, a sport utility vehicle that's popular with police departments around the country. In March, while he was behind the wheel of the SUV, LaHood passed out and had a minor accident. His attorney, Brian Chase, blames an exhaust leak that's been found in that model. "I want the public to be outraged over our police driving these cars to protect us, sometimes at very high rates of speed, are at risk of passing out and not only killing themselves, but crashing into us," Chase said.LaHood alleges that Ford Motor Co. knew about a potential exhaust leak in 2011 to 2015 Explorer police models and issued a recall. The automaker says it's aware of an odor in some Explorers, but adds that its own investigation has determined that it isn't a health or safety risk.The sergeant says he has lingering neurological damage and wants over a million dollars from Ford and the dealership which, his lawsuit alleges, failed to fix the problem.
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  • Photodisc/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Gun makers have boosted production in recent years, focusing on more high-caliber pistols and rifles designed for self-defense and shifting away from recreational firearms used for hunting and target shooting, the authors of a new study said.Gun violence kills more than 36,000 Americans each year, according to statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Authors of the study, published Thursday in The American Journal of Preventive Medicine, said research has focused on victims of gun violence and government policies, while their study is one of the first to focus on gun industry practices.Looking at data compiled by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, the researchers noted a significant increase in gun manufacturing overall from 2005 to 2013, in contrast to a slight downward trend before 2005.They also found that driving this growth was higher production of pistols and rifles, and the pistols tended to be higher-caliber models, or ones that fire larger bullets. The authors said that five major gun manufacturers control nearly 60 percent of the market, so changes in production of one manufacturer could significantly affect the others."It seems clear to us that the trend is for self-defense," lead study author Dr. Michael Siegel told ABC News.Siegel, a professor of community health sciences at the Boston University School of Public Health, further suggested that the findings provide evidence of a change in consumer demand."[Manufacturers] have reinvented guns not as a recreational sport or tool but as a symbol of freedom and security," he said.The study authors further suggested that the issue of gun violence should shift from the criminal justice perspective to the public health arena -- a point that has been opposed by the National Shooting Sports Foundation, a major industry organization for gun manufacturers."Guns are not a disease," Lawrence G. Keane, the foundation's senior vice president and general counsel, told ABC News in a statement. "There is no vaccine or health intervention for the criminal misuse of firearms."Siegel, however, said the study is important because it points to the industry's responsibility in preventing gun violence.He added that the goal of the research was not to deprive gun owners of their weapons."They are not the enemy in public health," he said. "There are ways to reduce gun violence while valuing gun owners' values … It has been painted too long as mutually exclusive."Siegel said that the group's next research steps are to identify the most effective methods and policies for isolating the small number of people who are most likely to commit acts of violence using guns."The solution lies in not taking guns away from people who are law-abiding but by being more effective at keeping guns out of the hands of the people who are at highest risk of gun violence," he said.
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  • Courtesy Kyle Miller(LANSING, Mich.) -- Hedy Steinbart, 92, learned how to make cherry-infused vodka from her parents in Germany in the 1940s.Today, Steinbart can go to her local liquor store in Lansing, Michigan, and purchase a bottle of her own drink thanks to her 28-year-old grandson, who created Oma’s Cherry Infused Vodka as a passion project to continue his grandmother’s legacy.“Our whole family was crying when we saw that,” Steinbart’s grandson, Kyle Miller, 28, said of the moment this month that Steinbart first saw her drink for sale on a store shelf. “My goal was nothing more than to carry on Oma’s legacy.”Miller, one of Steinbart’s four grandsons, has vivid memories from his childhood of watching Steinbart, who goes by Oma, German for grandmother, create her famous drink that was a staple at holidays and family celebrations.Steinbart, with the help of family, including her two children, would handpick cherries, place them in glass jars with vodka and other secret ingredients, and leave it to infuse for four months, occasionally adding sugar and more alcohol throughout the process.When Steinbart, who emigrated to the U.S. as a single woman in 1952, had to stop making the drink at age 90, Miller learned the process from her personally.In 2015, Miller, who works in the insurance industry, decided to make the drink for his family and close friends and had 75 pounds of Michigan cherries shipped to his apartment in Chicago, where the Michigan native moved after college."My roommate thought I was crazy," he said.Miller had a graphic designer make a label that told the history of his grandmother and the family recipe and shipped the bottles off as Christmas gifts.“My college friends all loved Oma so I sent it to all of them of course,” Miller said. “Once people got it they said, ‘This is awesome. I’ve got a wedding coming up. I want a case. I want more.’”Miller then embarked on what he calls his “passion project” and partnered with a distiller to make Steinbart’s homemade recipe scale-able for the mass market. The final product, which still uses handpicked Michigan cherries, was approved by Steinbart.“When we were trying to replicate the recipe, she would taste it and we did a blind taste test,” Miller said. “She’s going to tell you if she likes it or not so when we passed the blind taste test, I knew we were onto something.”Steinbart said her grandson put “quite an effort” into the years-long process of bringing the drink from her kitchen to stores.“I’m a little excited I think and surprised too, but nothing surprises me with Kyle,” she said.Oma’s Cherry Infused Vodka hit store shelves in Illinois in March and in the family’s home state of Michigan this month. The drink, which ranges in price from $34.95 to $39, is also available online and still features Steinbart's immigration and family story on the label."I have the ultimate respect for what she did and the label depicts what she means for our family," said Miller, who is now working with his business partners to raise additional capital to expand the brand to the Northeast.Steinbart, whose photo is also featured on the bottle, is still adjusting to the fame that came once her drink hit the market. She has been stopped at church and by her doctor, while members of her daughter’s book club who tried to buy the drink locally were stopped because it was sold out.“I can’t even tell you how amazing it is and what a wonderful tribute it is to my mom and how fun it’s all been,” said Steinbart's daughter, Dory Steinbart, who is also Miller’s mom.Dory Steinbart said she believes Miller wanted to carry on his grandmother’s legacy because Hedy Steinbart's story is one of “a resilient spirit.”“They started with nothing and truly lived the Am
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  • JaysonPhotography/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Another mixed day on Wall Street saw the indices give back most of their early-session gains on Thursday.The Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped 12.74 to a close of 21,397.29.The Nasdaq climbed to 6,236.69, a gain of 2.74, while the S&P 500 dipped to 2,434.50, dropping 1.11 on the day.Some employees at Uber have circulated a petition to bring back CEO Travis Kalanick. Kalanick resigned the position this week amid controversy, but it remains unclear exactly how unpopular he was within the company he created.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • BrianAJackson/iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- The Federal Communications Commission on Thursday announced a $120 million fine against a Miami man accused of making more than 100 million spoofed robocalls in a three-month span.According to the FCC, Adrian Abramovich used those spoofed calls to trick consumers into listening to his advertising messages. Approximately 80,000 spoofed calls were verified by the agency.According to a press release from the FCC, consumers reported receiving calls that they believed to be originating from local phone numbers. Once answered, however, an automated message encouraged them to "Press 1" to hear about travel deals. Those individuals who pressed the button were transferred to foreign call centers and operators attempted to sell them vacation packages, and often timeshares.The call centers were not affiliated with the comnpanies mentioned in the recorded message.TripAdvisor contacted the FCC regarding the calls in 2016, following complaints from customers who believed the company was responsible for the robocalls. Medical paging provider Spok also issued a complaint to the FCC, saying that the calls disrupted its network.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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