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  • Xinhua/Wang Ying/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- The "Fearless Girl" is moving.The popular statue is done staring down the "Charging Bull" on Broadway and will take a stand in front of the New York Stock Exchange, Mayor Bill de Blasio and State Street Global Advisors, the firm that commissioned the statue, announced Thursday.“Since Fearless Girl’s placement, more than 150 companies have added a female director to their boards,” State Street Global Advisors Chief Cyrus Taraporevala said. “Our hope is that by moving her closer to the NYSE, she will encourage more companies to take action and, more broadly, that she will continue to inspire people from all walks of life on the issue of gender diversity.”Created by sculptor Kristen Visbal, "Fearless Girl" was originally installed on Wall Street on the eve of International Women’s Day in 2017, accompanied by a call on the companies in which State Street Global Advisors invests to increase the number of women on their corporate boards.“We are proud to be home to the Fearless Girl,” Mayor de Blasio said. “She is a potent symbol of the need for change at the highest levels of corporate America -- and she will become a durable part of our city’s civic life.”The city thought the statue, currently on the Bowling Green median, needed a safer home because visitors often spill out onto crowded Broadway. It is also considering whether to move the Charging Bull as well because of pedestrian safety concerns."Fearless Girl" has not been without controversy. The artist behind the bull statue complained that it infringed on his work. But State Street said it has seen results from its campaign --152 companies have added a woman to their corporate boards, Taraporevala said.A spokesman for Mayor de Blasio said the girl and the bull may be reunited soon.“The Bull will almost certainly be moved and will very likely wind up reunited with Fearless Girl,” de Blasio’s spokesman, Eric Phillips, wrote on Twitter. “It’s tricky and some things still need to be sorted out.”Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • ABC News(PHILADELPHIA) -- The two black men who were arrested at a Starbucks in downtown Philadelphia last week and accused of trespassing said they were there for a business meeting that they hoped would change their lives.Rashon Nelson and Donte Robinson came forward Thursday morning on ABC News' Good Morning America to publicly share their story for the first time.The entrepreneurs and longtime friends said they were waiting to meet a potential business partner at the Starbucks in Philadelphia's Rittenhouse Square neighborhood when they saw police officers enter the store and speak with the manager."I was thinking, 'They can't be here for us,'" Robinson said in the interview with GMA Co-Anchor Robin Roberts.The pair didn't think anything of it until the officers approached their table and told them they needed to leave, they said."It was just, 'Get out. You have to leave. You're not buying anything, so you shouldn't be here,'" Nelson told GMA.They calmly told the officers they were there for a meeting, and Robinson said he even called the person they were waiting for. But the officers repeatedly insisted that they leave, they said."This is a real estate meeting. We’ve been working on this for months," Nelson said. "We're days away from changing our whole entire situation, our lives, and you about to sit here telling me I can’t do that? You’re not doing that."The officers ultimately handcuffed Nelson and Robinson, and escorted them out of the Starbucks and into a squad car before taking them to the police station. An onlooker captured the incident on video, which went viral and prompted Starbucks CEO Kevin Johnson to release a statement saying the "reprehensible outcome" should have never happened.Robinson said police never read them their Miranda rights when they were handcuffed and they were held in custody for eight hours."There was no reasoning,” he said. “They had nothing. They just kept using 'defiant trespassing' as their excuse for putting us behind bars.”
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  • ABC(NEW YORK) -- When recording artist and audio engineer Tiffany Miranda walks into a studio, she's used to standing out."As a woman, some of the challenges I faced were just people walking in the door and asking where the engineer is while I was sitting right behind the mixing console," said Miranda, whose work has appeared on American Idol and X-Factor. She has collaborated with many artists and producers, including Rick Ross and DJ Khaled."A lot of guys weren't really used to seeing girls behind the boards," she said.But Miranda didn't want to accept that as the status quo. Instead, she decided to work toward correcting the gender disparity in music production by founding Girls Make Beats, an organization dedicated to helping young girls interested in becoming music producers.The group hosts educational seminars, summer camps and networking events -- all with the goal of helping girls further their careers in music."Girls Make Beats came about because of my own personal story and struggles in the music industry," Miranda said. "I found out very early on that it was tough for girls to break into music technology fields, and there's actually never been a woman to win a Grammy for their music production -- ever."The numbers back up Miranda's experience. Female songwriters and producers are outnumbered by men, according to a University of South Carolina Annenberg report conducted between 2012 to 2017. Female songwriters and producers made up only 12.3 percent of songwriters for the top 600 songs of the last six years. Also among the findings: Two percent of producers across 300 songs were female, translating into a major gender ratio of 49 males to every female."When I was growing up, there were literally no women that I could look up to and aspire to be -- the next big audio engineer, that next big music producer," she said. "So with Girls Make Beats, we're out there -- we're bringing the program to these girls and their schools. We're introducing them to these really cool and fun fields like DJing, music production and audio engineering, and getting them excited about it from an early age."The organization started in Miami, but recently opened a chapter in Los Angeles and is organizing programs in several major cities across the United States.The program aims to help young girls such as 11-year-old Bella Villa, whose nickname is DJ Bella."I knew there wasn't a lot of female DJs, and I wanted to finally become one," she said. "My favorite part was learning how to mix songs together."Working alongside other young girls with the same goals has helped 16-year-old Jerica Hatcher, also known as DJ Blessed, gain confidence in her skills."My favorite part of the program is just being here with the girls, coming together to make music that people will want to hear," she said. Miranda believes that the benefits of the programs extend beyond music production. Regardless of what career the girls pursue, she said she hopes they will carry the sense of accomplishment from Girl Makes Beats with them."It's really about the confidence that they build and knowing that they can tackle anything that they put their minds to," she said.Miranda's advice to young girls is to be persistent and don't take "no" for an answer."Never wait for your opportunities, but create them," she said. "When you hear 'no,' that's OK. That means 'not now.' That means go work on your craft. Make another beat. Go do something that's going to be proactive in getting you to the next step."
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  • Mark Makela/Getty Images(PHILADELPHIA) -- The former Starbucks manager whose telephone call initiated the controversial arrest of two African-American men at her downtown Philadelphia store told 911, “I have two gentlemen at my cafe that are refusing to make a purchase or leave,” according to the taped audio of the call released by police Tuesday.Responding to the 4:37 p.m. call last Thursday, the operator said she would send police to the location at 18th and Spruce Streets and, about three minutes later, a radio dispatcher can be heard in the audio saying, “1801 Spruce at Starbucks a group of males” was “refusing to leave.”After police arrived, they requested an additional officer and supervisor, according to the audio.Police then radioed at 5 p.m. that they would be transporting the two arrested men to police headquarters.The incident has prompted widespread condemnation, protests, an apology from Starbucks’ CEO and a plan to close all the U.S. company-owned stores for an afternoon of racial-bias education. The manager is no longer employed there.Melissa DePino, whose video of the arrest went viral on social media, told ABC News the men were doing nothing more than sitting at a table when police officers entered the shop, put them in handcuffs and hauled them away.Starbucks released a statement Tuesday saying all 8,000 of its nationwide company-owned stores will shut down for a few hours May 29 for racial-bias education for about 175,000 employees.In a supplemental video with the statement, Starbucks CEO Kevin Johnson, who has zeroed in on "unconscious bias," said the move comes as they are “committed to being part of the solution,” and that this training “is just one step in a journey that requires dedication from every level of our company and partnerships in our local communities.”
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Almost two months after Dick’s Sporting Goods announced they will no longer be selling assault-style weapons, the company announced it is destroying the unsold stock.“We are in the process of destroying all firearms and accessories that are no longer for sale as a result of our Feb. 28 policy change. We are destroying the firearms in accordance with federal guidelines and regulations,” the company said in a statement to ABC News.In late February, two weeks after the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, Dick’s Sporting Goods announced that they would no longer sell assault-style rifles or high capacity magazines. The company also said it would no longer sell firearms or ammunition of anyone under the age of 21 years old.“Following all of the rules and laws, we sold a shotgun to the Parkland shooter in November of 2017. It was not the gun, nor type of gun, he used in the shooting. But it could have been,” the company said in February.Dick’s Sporting Goods had already removed all assault-style rifles from all Dick’s stores after the Sandy Hook shooting but removed them from sale at all 35 Field and Stream stores following the shooting in Parkland.In an interview with George Stephanopoulos on Good Morning America, Dick’s Sporting Goods Chairman and CEO Edward Stack said, “We’re staunch supporters of the Second Amendment. I’m a gun owner myself. We’ve just decided that based on what’s happened with these guns, we don’t want to be a part of this story and we’ve eliminated these guns permanently.”Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Chris Jackson/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- With the royal wedding between Prince Harry and Meghan Markle just weeks away, all eyes are speculating on what dress Markle will wear on her big day.Good Housekeeping's style director Lori Bergamotto appeared live on "Good Morning America" to break down some of the most popular royal wedding looks in the past, and share ways to recreate them on a budget.Kate Middleton's Alexander McQueen dressThe Duchess of Cambridge donned a custom-made, Victorian-inspired satin and lace gown designed by Sarah Burton, the creative director for Alexander McQueen, during her wedding to Prince William in 2011. The gown featured a nearly 9-foot train and is estimated to have cost more than $400,000.She paired it with a Cartier halo tiara she borrowed from Queen Elizabeth, and wore a mid-length silk tulle veil with lace trim.The royal stealBergamotto showed how you can recreate this look using a dress from H&M's new bridal collection that many believe is heavily inspired by Middleton's dress, and a tiara and veil from David's Bridal.Dress: H&M Long Lace dress, available on their website for $299.Tiara: David's Bridal mid-height tiara with pearls and crystals, available on their website for $149.95.Veil: David's Bridal lace edge fingertip veil, available on their website for $149.95.Meghan Markle's Suits Anne Barge wedding dressMarkle's character on Suits donned an Anne Barge tulle gown with a plunging V-neck, beading and a sheer back that cost more than $6,800. Markle has said that her character's style is similar to her own, as speculation mounts over what dress she will wear on her big day.The royal steal, option 1You can recreate this look for less than $100 by putting together a bodysuit from Asos and a skirt from Amazon, according to Bergamotto. She added that her big takeaway tip is that you can mimic a dress you love for less by thinking about it as separates, and you can also get more bang for your buck this way because you can re-wear the pieces individually.Bodysuit: Asos Blair bodysuit, available on their website for $45.Skirt: Amazon's Tutu Tulle skirt, available on their website for $39.The royal steal, option 2Top: Jenny Yoo Sylvie top, available on BHLDN's website for $180.Skirt: Jenny Yoo Louise tulle skirt, available on BHLDN's website for $220.Princess Diana’s David and Elizabeth Emmanuel DressDiana's iconic David and Elizabeth Emmanuel dress featured a dramatic silk taffeta gown with a 25-foot train and a veil that employed 153 yards of tulle. The dress cost approximately $16,000. Bergamotto said she found a replica of Diana's dress from designer Rachel Zoe's debut bridal collection that features the same feminine, romantic vibe with a modern twist.The royal stealDress: Rachel Zoe Collection violet gown, available on Rachel Zoe's website for $695.Tiara: David’s Bridal regal tier tiara, available on their website for $149.95.Veil: David’s Bridal single-tier raw edge 165-inch cathedral veil, available on their website for $149.95.
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