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  • Harry How/Getty Images(PYEONGCHANG, South Korea) -- The Canadian women's hockey team had won the gold medal in the last four Olympics, three of the four coming over the United States, including a 3-2 overtime victory in Sochi in 2014. The two met again in the finals this year, but this time it was the United States who won the gold for the first time since 1998 in Nagano, when they beat Canada.
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  • Phil Ellsworth/ESPN Images(PYEONGCHANG, South Korea) -- David Wise waited until his last chance, but the American pulled out a gold medal repeat in the men’s ski halfpipe event at the Pyeongchang Olympics on Thursday morning.The 27-year-old from Nevada had two unsuccessful runs before he earned his winning score of 97.20 on his third and final run."I really wanted to land a run. I walked out of a ski twice. For both runs I walked out of a ski. Not really a mistake I made, but it was just unfortunate, so I had to put it all down on the third run, and I pulled it off," Wise said. "I'm honestly just in disbelief right now. Winning, losing, whatever, just the fact that I landed that run in the moment when it needed to happen, on that third run, just felt so good."The ski halfpipe event debuted at the Sochi 2014 Olympics when Wise earned a gold medal in his Olympic debut.“I'm a spiritual person and I believe that everything happens for a reason," he said. "I said, 'OK, if God wants me to do well in this event, then I'm going to be able to land this run. If he doesn't, it's all good, I'm moving on.' So I dropped in and did the run that I knew how to do."Wise had the support of his daughter, 6, and son, 3, who came to Pyeongchang to support him."Nayeli didn't get to go to Russia, so she was watching from home. Here she is now, she's 6 years old," Wise said. "My 3-year-old is around here somewhere. It's such an honor to be out here competing, doing what I love, and having them here to support me. It's amazing."Wise’s teammate, Alex Ferreira from Colorado, also earned a medal in the halfpipe event. Ferreira won the silver medal with a score of 96.40 while New Zealand’s Nico Porteous got third place with 94.80. This is the 23-year-old Ferreira’s first Olympics."I just woke up feeling good today," Ferreira said. "[My] main rule: Never give up. Never leave anything on the table, never let anything down. Always rise to potential, always rise to the occasion."Ferreira also talked about the hard work he put in preparing for the Olympics."Five days a week in the gym, five days a week in the steam room, five days a week on the trampoline, two times a week in the sports psychologist, three times a week for PT [physical therapy] -- every single day of my life," he said. "I couldn't do it without my team."Ferreira was also able to share his experience with family and friends."I'm fired up, baby. I'm so stoked, I'm so happy for my family to come out and all my best friends, for something so magical," he said. "I'll never forget it. I'm unbelievably pumped, I'm elated."Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Eddie Perlas/ESPN Images(PYEONGCHANG, South Korea) -- American Jamie Anderson finished second in the big-air event to become the first woman to medal twice in snowboarding at a single Olympics.Two men, Zan Kosir and Vic Wild, each accomplished the feat in 2014.Anderson, who earlier won gold in slopestyle, an event she also won in 2014, joined Kelly Clark and Shaun White as the only U.S. competitors to each win three snowboarding medals.In big-air, snowboarders are judged on posture, tricks performed in mid-air, the difficulty of tricks and landings. Only the best two of three attempts are counted.Anderson, 27, started out strong, leading by 6 points after her first run, but she had to settle for the silver medal after not landing a cab-1080 in third run. Her final score of 177.25 trailed Austrian Anna Gasser's 185. Zoi Sadowski-Synnott of New Zealand took bronze with 157.5."I chose to kind of play it a little bit safe and put two down and then hope to land it on my third run, which, unfortunately, didn't work out." Anderson said. "But I'm so proud of myself for just sending it and trying it."Anderson said it was the best big-air event she'd ever been a part of, "with it being the Olympics and everyone wanting to do their best, and really showcase what the babes are all about."The big-air finals were moved up to Thursday from Friday partly to help ensure good weather and course conditions, which allowed Anderson and her peers "to do what we're capable of.""It feels better," Anderson added, "because we have great conditions and everyone was able to ride their best. So it feels rewarding. It just feels good."Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Here are the latest scores from yesterday's sports events:  NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUEChicago 3, Ottawa 2; SOAnaheim 2, Dallas 0Vegas 7, Calgary 3
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  • Harry How/Getty Images(PYEONGCHANG, South Korea) --  The U.S. women's hockey team has made no secret of their goal in Pyeongchang. They've been training for four years for just one game: a gold medal matchup with Canada.“Good Morning America” anchor Amy Robach sat down with team members -- and sisters -- Monique and Jocelyne Lamoureux before their highly anticipated women’s hockey game overnight Thursday.Monique Lamoureux told Robach the USA is ready for redemption after losing in the final game four years ago."It's tough to put into words -- we've literally been training four years for this one game," Monique said. "We have done everything we can as a team to be successful and hopefully we get the result that we we’ve been working for four years."Canada has dominated Team USA in women’s hockey, beating them three times in the final and winning the last four gold medals at the Olympics. The U.S. last won gold 20 years ago in Nagano, Japan.It was a painful loss for the USA vs. Canada four years ago in Sochi."A lot of people have asked, 'If we won a gold medal in Pyeongchang, will it take away the sting in Sochi?'" Monique said. "I don't think any amount of win would ever take away that loss -- and a win certainly would not take away what happened in Sochi -- but it would definitely be a bittersweet ending to what we've been building for the last four years and for some of us this is our third crack at it, so it will be pretty special for us."Jocelyne Lamoureux, who scored two goals six seconds apart during the USA win over Russia in the group stage, told Robach how the USA women’s hockey team has prepared for Canada."We have played this game thousands of times in our heads and prepared for it, months of preparation: physically, mentally," Jocelyne said. "We are confident in the group we have ... to end the streak."Monique and Jocelyne are mirror-image twins from North Dakota. This is their third Olympics and they already have silver medals from Sochi and Vancouver. Monique is left-handed and Jocelyne is right-handed, but they are both right-handed on the ice."We definitely take advance of being familiar around the ice with each other and where we are and we are able to make quick plays without necessarily having to look. We communicate really well on the ice," Jocelyne said."It's been a lot of fun playing with Jocelyne; we always have that familiarity and that chemistry when we are on the ice together so to be able to bring that to showcase it at the Olympics has been pretty special,” Monique said.Despite a convenient excuse with the outbreak of the norovirus at the Pyeongchang Olympics, the twins said there was no doubt they would still shake hands with the Canadians."I think we owed them that respect and I think it's mutual," Jocelyn said.What will the Lamoureux twins do after they get home?"This next game is the last time the group of 23 women are gonna get to play together ... so a lot of us will cherish the few days we have together, hopefully be celebrating and after that be going back to our respective homes and enjoying some time with family as we all have been away for the past six months," Monique said. "Some of us have dogs to get back to that we miss dearly, husbands and families, so we are really excited to what's to come after the Olympics."Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Nils Petter Nilsson/Getty Images(PYEONGCHANG, South Korea) -- Americans Jessica Diggins and Kikkan Randall, the only mom athlete on Team USA, made history on Wednesday by winning gold in the women’s team sprint cross-country event at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea.It’s the first-ever Olympic cross-county gold medal for the United States and the first-ever Olympic medal in the sport for U.S. women.Diggins, 26, had an incredibly strong push in the last lap and came from behind to win. "In the final stretch, I was just thinking, 'Go, go, go. I'm giving it everything I had, and I've got someone who I really love and care about waiting for me at the finishing line, and I just want to make her proud.’’Randall, who was on edge watching the final lap, said, "I felt like Charlotte Kalla [of Sweden] and I had a screaming match. Her teammate was coming down and she went, 'Come on.' And I went, 'Diggins,' and I had so much adrenaline as she was coming down.”“But if there's anybody I'd have 100 percent faith in coming down that finishing stretch as fast as possible, it's Jessie. So that was just a wonderful feeling to take it all in and watch it happen," Randall, 35, added.Bill Koch won the United States’ first Olympic cross-country medal 42 years ago at the 1976 Olympics, taking home a silver medal in the 30-kilometer (18 miles) event. Cross-country, or Nordic, skiing has been an Olympic event since the games in 1924 in Chamonix, France, but the women’s event wasn’t added until 1952.Randall, of Alaska, is ending on a career high, earning the gold medal in her fifth and final Olympics. She missed the 2014 Sochi Games because of a strain in her lower back. She also gave birth to her son, Breck, in April 2016.“It still doesn't feel real,” she said. “It's what I've been working on for 20 years and with this team for the last five years and -- wow."Diggins, of Minnesota, made her Olympic debut in Sochi four years ago, placing eight in the individual skiathon. But she redeemed herself Wednesday with a strong finish, surpassing her Norwegian competitors at the very end to clench the gold medal.ABC News contributor Steven Nyman, who competed in three Olympics for the United States and is friends with Randall and Diggins, became emotional watching the event.“History was truly made tonight -- the first Olympic medal for any American woman in cross-country," Nyman said. "It has been a long time in the making, and no better two to make it happen. Kikkan Randall inspired a whole movement or youth skiers, and for her to win this medal alongside the future of the team and Jessie Diggins was incredible.”Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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