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  • ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- There's no honeymoon for Donald Trump in a new ABC News/Washington Post poll, but also no regrets: He approaches his 100th day in office with the lowest approval rating at this point of any president in polls since 1945 –- yet 96 percent of those who supported him in November say they'd do it again today. His challenges are considerable. Majorities say Trump lacks the judgment and the temperament it takes to serve effectively. Six in 10 doubt his honesty and trustworthiness, see him as out of touch and don't think he understands the problems of people like them. Fifty-six percent say he hasn't accomplished much in his first 100 days. And 55 percent say he doesn't follow a consistent set of principles in setting policy (though fewer see this as a problem, 48 percent).All told, 42 percent of Americans approve of Trump's performance as president, while 53 percent disapprove. That compares to an average of 69-19 percent for past presidents at or near 100 days in office -– for example, 69-26 percent for Trump's predecessor, Barack Obama.Still, the national survey also finds some brighter spots for the president –- chiefly in pushing for jobs and in foreign policy –- as well as deep popularity problems for the opposition party. Sixty-seven percent say the Democratic Party is out of touch with the concerns of most Americans, even more than say the same about Trump, and similar to the Republican Party (62 percent). That's a steeply negative turn for the Democrats, 19 percentage points more critical than when last asked three years ago, including especially steep losses in their own base.Trump's better grades include broad 73 percent approval of his pressuring companies to keep jobs in the United States –- even most Democrats, liberals and nonwhites approve, three groups that are broadly critical of Trump more generally. And more than half, 53 percent, see him as a strong leader, although that compares with 77 percent for Obama at this stage.On one specific issue, a plurality, 46 percent, says he's handling the situation with North Korea "about right," as opposed to being too aggressive (37 percent) or too cautious (just 7 percent). Similarly, a recent ABC/Post poll found 51 percent support for Trump's missile strikes on Syria; together these results make his foreign policy a comparative bright spot. They're also a contrast with Obama, seen by 53 percent as too cautious in his foreign policy in fall 2014, as he dealt with Syria and Russian intervention in Ukraine.As noted, this poll, produced for ABC by Langer Research Associates, finds no evidence of buyer's remorse among Trump supporters. Among those who report having voted for him in November, 96 percent today say it was the right thing to do; a mere 2 percent regret it. And if a rerun of the election were held today, the poll indicates even the possibility of a Trump victory in the popular vote among 2016 voters.In two break-even results, Americans divide, 44-41 percent, on whether Trump is keeping most of his campaign promises, and likewise divide, 35-35 percent, on whether he's doing a better or worse job than they expected. Views turn negative, as noted, on how much Trump has accomplished in his first three months. Forty-two percent say a great deal or good amount, but 56 percent say not much or nothing.Again, Obama scored far better on all three of these measures at his 100th day, 60-26 percent on keeping his promises, 54-18 percent on performing better vs. worse than expected and 63-36 percent on his accomplishments.There are difficulties for Trump in other results, as well. Just 37 percent approve of the major changes in federal spending he's proposed (50 percent disapprove) and only 34 percent approve of his having given his daughter and son-in-law, Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner, major positions in his administration (61 percent disapprove). (There are only three groups in which more than half approve of these appointmen
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- Members of Congress will return to Washington next week to confront a government shutdown deadline and a White House eager to notch some legislative victories, especially on health care.The most pressing business is government funding: The House and Senate have until midnight Friday to cut a trillion-dollar spending deal to prevent a partial government shutdown on President Trump's 100th day in office.While bipartisan negotiations continue on Capitol Hill, Trump is driving a hard bargain, insisting on money to begin construction on a border wall and boost defense spending.Democrats insist they won't support a downpayment on the Southwest border wall, and are pushing back against Trump's threat of stopping key federal subsidy payments to health insurers under Obamacare.Sources close to negotiations expect Congress to pass a short-term funding measure -– anywhere between one and three weeks -- to give appropriators more time to finalize a larger spending deal to fund the government through the end of the fiscal year in September.Beyond keeping the government's lights on, Republicans, encouraged by the White House, are still hoping to revive the GOP health care bill that was pulled from the House floor roughly a month ago.Moderate Rep. Tom MacArthur, R-New Jersey, has floated a proposed amendment that would give states the ability to request to opt out of certain Obamacare regulations while making essential health benefits –- the requirement that all plans cover things like prescription drugs and mental health services -– the federal standard.Members are waiting to review legislative text for the proposal, and a vote could come midweek after members return to Washington on Tuesday.Despite pressure from the White House to put points on the board ahead of Trump's 100th day in office, it's not clear that the underlying political dynamics that sank the health care bill initially have changed, and that the amended version could garner 216 votes on the House floor.In a conference call with members Saturday, House Speaker Paul Ryan said legislative language for the MacArthur amendment is being finalized, according to a GOP source on the call.He made clear that there will be a vote only when it's clear the bill has enough support, and that votes will drive the timing, according to the source.Additionally, Trump has said that starting "next week" he will be unveiling his tax reform package with "massive" tax cuts for all Americans."It really formally begins on Wednesday," he told reporters on Friday.House Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady said in a statement that his committee is "ready to work" with the White House, although it's not clear what exactly will materialize next week.The White House and Republicans also have their sights on the Dodd-Frank Act signed by President Obama following the 2008 financial crisis. The House Financial Services Committee is holding a hearing this week on a GOP replacement to the law.
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  • ABC News(NEW YORK) -- California's top law enforcement officer said his state is "ready" to confront the Trump administration over its funding threats against so-called sanctuary cities.State Attorney General Xavier Becerra responded in an interview on ABC's This Week Sunday to warnings by the Trump administration that it could cut funding to sanctuary cities, which are places that limit how much local police forces can cooperate with federal immigration authorities.Becerra contrasted the role of the federal government with California’s law enforcement agencies."We fully respect that they have the responsibility to enforce immigration law," he told ABC News Chief Anchor George Stephanopoulos. "We are in the business of public safety. We're not in the business of deportation."He said California abides by federal laws on immigration and asserted that the U.S. government cannot order state or local jurisdictions to change their approach to public safety."We're going to continue to abide by federal law and the U.S. Constitution,” Becerra said. “And we're hoping the federal government will also abide by the U.S. Constitution, which gives my state the right to decide how to do public safety.”The Trump administration on Friday sent letters to officials in California and major cities including New York, Chicago, Philadelphia and New Orleans, warning them that they may lose coveted law-enforcement grant money unless they document cooperation with federal immigration authorities.Stephanopoulos asked Becerra about Sessions' remarks in an earlier This Week interview Sunday. "You heard him. He's saying, especially in California, you're not fulfilling that duty" of cooperation, Stephanopoulos said."We can prove anywhere we need to ... that we are protecting our people," Becerra responded. "And we're doing it by keeping families together, not separating them." Stephanopoulos also asked the attorney general about the apparently confusing messages from the Trump administration on the status of DREAMers, unauthorized immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as children and who are currently protected from deportation by orders signed by former President Obama.Trump on Friday said DREAMers should "rest easy," but Sessions said on "This Week" that they, like all unauthorized immigrants, are "subject to being deported."  "It's not clear what we can trust, what statement we can believe in" regarding DREAMers, Becerra said. "And that causes a great deal of not just anxiety, but confusion, not just for those immigrant families, but for our law enforcement personnel.""I've been trying to reach out to Attorney General Sessions and to [Department of Homeland Security] Secretary Kelly, to get a sense of really what is their policy when it comes to the DREAMers," the California attorney general said. "We'd like to know, is it in fact a policy of this president and this administration and this Attorney General Sessions to abide by the ... policy that allows DREAMers to continue to go to school, to go to work, to believe that they're not going to be out there and be apprehended by [immigration] agents simply because they look like people who weren't born here?"Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- Striking a different tone than President Trump on DREAMers, Attorney General Jeff Sessions said they like “everyone that enters the country unlawfully” are “subject to being deported.”The Trump administration has let stand former President Obama's order protecting so-called DREAMers, unauthorized immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as children, from deportation. And President Trump said Friday that young people protected under this policy “should rest easy.”Sessions, in an exclusive interview Sunday on This Week, told ABC News Chief Anchor George Stephanopoulos, “There’s no doubt the president has sympathy for young people who were brought here at early ages.”He also said the Department of Homeland Security's “first and strongest priority -- no doubt about it" is to arrest unauthorized immigrants who have committed crimes. "They’re focusing primarily on that,” he said.“We don't have the ability to round up everybody and there's no plans to do that,” Sessions said. “But we're going to focus first, as the president has directed us, on the criminal element and we've got to get that under control.”Pressed by Stephanopoulos on whether DREAMers can “rest easy” as the president said, Sessions said, “Well, we’ll see. I believe that everyone who enters the country illegally is subject to being deported.In an interview with the Associated Press on Friday, President Trump said, “We aren't looking to do anything right now” about DREAMers.When the president was asked if the official policy of his administration is to allow DREAMers to stay in the country, he gave a definitive “yes.”“That's our policy,” Trump said. “Long-term we are going to have to fix the problem, the whole immigration problem ... Here is what they can hear: The DREAMers should rest easy. OK? I'll give you that. The DREAMers should rest easy.”Striking a different tone than President Trump on DREAMers, Attorney General Jeff Sessions said “everyone that enters the country unlawfully is subject to being deported.” Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Shawn Thew - Pool/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- President Trump made his first visit as president to Walter Reed Medical Center on Saturday, awarding the Purple Heart to Army Sgt. 1st Class Alvaro Barrientos."I heard about this and I wanted to do it myself," the president said before pinning the Purple Heart on Barrientos in a small ceremony at the military hospital facility also known as "The President's Hospital.""Congratulations on behalf of Melania, myself, and the entire nation," the president told Barrientos, with the first lady and Barrientos' wife standing nearby. "Tremendous job."Barrientos received the medal for wounds he received last month in Afghanistan. The injury resulted in the amputation of part of his right leg.Following the ceremony, the president and first lady spent time away from cameras privately greeting other wounded warriors recovering at the medical facility.The president announced his visit to Walter Reed shortly before departing the White House, saying in a tweet that he was "looking forward to seeing our bravest and greatest Americans!"
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  • wellphoto/iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- President Trump, who previously announced that he would not be attending the White House Correspondents Dinner next Saturday night, said today that he will instead hold a rally for supporters that night in Pennsylvania.The president announced the rally in a tweet on Saturday.
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