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  • ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- President Trump's address to a joint session of Congress on Tuesday night has drawn praise from pundits and fans on social media being more presidential than other speeches he has given since taking office.There was a stark contrast between his congressional address -- during which he told Americans that the "time for trivial fighting is over" and asked them to "dream big" -- and his inaugural address 40 days earlier -- where he said that "American carnage stops right here" and talked about poverty, crimes, gangs and drugs.A senior White House adviser said that the same roster of advisers who were involved in helping craft the inaugural speech were also involved in this speech. That said, the senior adviser confirmed to ABC News that while many people weighed in, policy adviser and frequent speechwriter Stephen Miller played a major role in the creation of Tuesday night’s speech.Trump gathered with a key group of longtime advisers -- Chief of Staff Reince Priebus, spokeswoman Hope Hicks, senior adviser Jared Kushner, counselor Kellyanne Conway and Miller -- in the White House's map room on Tuesday, hours before the speech, the senior White House adviser told ABC News. They went around the room and offered suggestions to the draft, the adviser said.White House officials say the change in tone is partly Trump realizing what is possible and understanding what he needs to do in order to get things done.Just a few hours before the speech, Conway told Fox News that "it's a beautiful speech that will be delivered from the heart."There could also be another untitled adviser who influenced the speech. A number of initiatives that Trump mentioned in his speech -- paid family leave, women's health, and clean air and water -- are close to his eldest daughter Ivanka’s heart.It remains unclear what role she may have played in crafting the speech, however, there were two clear instances on Tuesday where her public presence was notable.Earlier in the day, she was seen standing directly behind Trump when he signed two bills relating to helping promote women in science and technology fields and another bill relating to female entrepreneurship.And then during Tuesday's speech, she was seated directly next to Carryn Owens, the widow of Navy SEAL William "Ryan" Owens, who was killed during a raid in Yemen in January.Though Ivanka remains an informal adviser to her father and does not have an official White House role, she has been a regular presence throughout his term at both public events and behind the scenes. She and her husband, Jared, were in the car along with Donald and Melania Trump as they were shuttled to the Capitol, and it appeared that he was reading over some papers -- perhaps going through some last-minute speech prep.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- The White House has determined that Kellyanne Conway acted "inadvertently" and "without nefarious motive or intent" when she promoted Ivanka Trump's fashion line in an interview with Fox News last month, according to a White House letter to the Office of Government Ethics obtained by ABC News. In a Feb. 28 letter to OGE Director Walter Shaub, White House deputy counsel Stefan Passantino said he met with Conway about the incident and briefed her on federal employee ethics laws. "We concluded that Ms. Conway acted inadvertently and is highly unlikely to do so again," he wrote. "Ms. Conway has acknowledged her understanding of the Standards and has reiterated her commitment to abiding by them in the future."After the incident last month, OGE sent a letter to the White House calling for an investigation and review of Conway's actions - which Shaub described as a "clear violation of the prohibition against misuse of position" - and recommended disciplinary action. Rep. Elijah Cummings, D-Maryland, the top Democrat on the House Oversight Committee, said the lack of disciplinary action is "a very bad sign.""Other federal employees would likely be suspended for engaging in this conduct, and White House officials should not be held to a different standard," he said in a statement. "I hope that the President reconsiders his decision and that he and his staff will take their ethical obligations more seriously.” While OGE can still recommend a specific penalty for Conway to the White House, that recommendation would be non-binding. Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • US Congress(WASHINGTON) -- The Senate has confirmed another of President Donald Trump's Cabinet nominees, approving Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke by a 68-31 margin.
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  • Jim Lo Scalzo/EPA/Pool/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — President Donald Trump delivered his first address to a joint session of Congress Tuesday night, addressing a host of familiar themes from his campaign and calling for unity to address a litany of issues that he says are plaguing the country.Trump's call for an end to the "pure unadulterated division" and "trivial fights" comes in the wake of a bruising campaign and a tumultuous start to his presidency, squaring off against critics as well as waging a pitched battle against the media. The speech also comes amid a flurry of questions about alleged contacts between Trump associates and suspected Russian officials, which the president has derided as "fake news.""The time for small thinking is over," Trump said. "The time for trivial fights is behind us. We just need the courage to share the dreams that fill our hearts. The bravery to express the hopes that stir our souls. And the confidence to turn those hopes and those dreams into action."
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  • ABC News(NEW YORK) — Vice President Mike Pence said Wednesday "no one is going to fall through the cracks" in President Donald Trump's plan to repeal and replace Obamacare."What the president wants the Congress to do is to create a framework for people to be able to afford coverage," Pence said on ABC News' Good Morning America. "I think the president has made it clear no one is going to fall through the cracks in this."
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — The Trump administration plans to announce its revised executive order banning travel from several Muslim-majority countries Wednesday afternoon, multiple government officials tell ABC News.ABC News previously reported that a draft of the new executive order does not automatically reject refugees from Syria, and clarifies that green card holders and dual citizens of the U.S. and the seven previously identified countries — Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen — are exempt.The officials declined to discuss specific details of the new order, and one official said its language was still changing as of Tuesday afternoon, a notion that runs counter to claims last week by White House press secretary Sean Spicer that the order was "finalized" and was "awaiting implementation.""What we are doing is now in the implementation phase of working with the respective departments and agencies to make sure that when we execute this, it’s done in a manner that’s flawless," Spicer said last Thursday.Officials also confirmed that the president plans to announce the new order from the Department of Justice alongside Attorney General Jeff Sessions and Secretary of Homeland Security John Kelly.Trump's previous order faced legal challenges almost immediately after its signing on Jan. 27. A federal judge in Washington State issued a temporary restraining order halting the order on February 3, a move that was later upheld by the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals on Feb. 9.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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