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  • iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- Counselor to the president Kellyanne Conway insisted this week that the Senate GOP health care bill does not include cuts to Medicaid.Meanwhile, Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price said the health care proposal would not cause Medicaid recipients to lose their health coverage. The government "would not allow individuals to fall through the cracks," he noted. "We would not pull the rug out from under anybody.”President Donald Trump promised during his campaign that he would not touch Medicaid, the federal health care program for lower-income Americans. This group includes expected mothers, children, seniors and disabled individuals.But does the Senate Republican health care bill actually cut Medicaid funding and coverage?While the estimated government spending on Medicaid would increase under the Senate health care bill gradually over time, it will spend less each year on the program than what the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, currently allots.If Obamacare remains intact, the government would spend an estimated $415 billion next year on Medicaid, and $624 billion by the year 2026, according to the review of the bill from the Congressional Budget Office (CBO).If the Senate bill is passed and goes into effect in 2018, the government would spend an estimated $403 billion on Medicaid that fiscal year. That number increases to $466 billion by the year 2026, according to the CBO.The CBO also estimated that federal spending on Medicaid from now until 2026 would be $772 billion less than what is projected to be spent under the current law. The Senate bill, however, leads to more government spending on Medicaid in that amount of time than the House GOP bill.The CBO's latest analysis was done using its March 2016 baseline.States that opted into Medicaid expansion under the ACA by March 2017 would see government funding reduced starting in 2021.The bill phases out funding at a lower rate for Medicaid expansion under Obamacare by 2024.In 2021 under the ACA, states would receive 90 percent matching rate for states that opted into Medicaid expansion, but the Senate bill will chip it down to 85 percent. The Senate bill drops the federal matching rate by five percentage points each year until 2024. After 2024, Medicaid funding to states will be at the regular rate and could be cut further due to changes in how rate increases and payments to states are calculated. At that point, with reduced funds and little enrollment presumably, states’ governors may choose to forgo Medicaid expansion.If the current version of the Senate GOP bill becomes law, states can choose whether to receive funds by a per capita cap, determined by the number of people enrolled, or a block grant.The CBO report makes one thing clear: the amount of federal revenues collected and the amount of spending on Medicaid “would almost surely both be lower than under current law," and the number of uninsured people under the Senate health care bill “would almost surely be greater than under current law.”
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell told Republican senators he is delaying a vote on the GOP health care bill until after the Fourth of July recess because he does not have the votes to move it to debate, two senior Senate Republican aides told ABC News.Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell formally confirmed the delay, saying, "We're going to continue the discussions within our conference on the differences that we have."Sen. John Thune, R-Neb., stressed that the goal was to still replace Obamacare."While the schedule may have slipped a little bit, we are intent on rescuing Americans from a failed systems that has driven up their cost and made it more difficult for them to find coverage," Thune said.Earlier Tuesday, Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn told ABC News: "I expect to have the support and get it done ... and yes, we will vote this week."At least five Republican senators said they had opposed the procedural vote on the GOP health care plan, effectively blocking the bill from reaching the Senate floor.In order to pass the health care bill through the Senate, Republicans can afford only two defections; in case of a tie, they have the option of calling in Vice President Mike Pence to cast the tie-breaking vote.Before the delay was announced, Republicans senators were invited to the White House for a meeting with President Donald Trump."The president invited us to come down," McConnell said at a news conference this afternoon. "The White House has been very much involved in these discussions. They're very anxious to help, and we appreciate the invitation, and I hope all of our members will head down."
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  • Ethan Miller/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- A political action committee for President Trump has pulled an attack advertisement against a member of the president's own party, Republican Sen. Dean Heller of Nevada, over his opposition to the Senate health care bill.America First Policies PAC released the ad Tuesday, making it the first pro-Trump organization to publicly attack a Republican officeholder.The advertisement asked viewers to call Sen. Heller and tell him to “keep his promise” and “vote yes to repeal and replace Obamacare.” The ad also says that a down vote by the senator would pose an obstacle to his own party and the Trump administration who it says finally have a “real chance to repeal and replace Obamacare.”Erin Montgomery, the communications director at America First Policies, said in a statement Tuesday night the PAC was "pleased" that Heller "has decided to come back to the table to negotiate with his colleagues on the Senate bill."
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  • Spencer Platt/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Roger Stone, a longtime associate of President Trump, will testify before the House Intelligence Committee on July 24 in a closed-door session, ABC News has learned.Stone's scheduled appearance before the committee, which is investigating Russia's interference in the U.S. election in 2016 and possible ties to Trump associates, was first reported by Politico."Roger Stone has been maligned by innuendo and misinformation regarding all of the events surrounding this investigation," an attorney for Stone said in a statement. "Roger looks forward to using his time in front of the committee to set the record straight and providing a timeline based only on fact that will clearly establish that those on the committee who have misrepresented the facts regarding his involvement, did so based on false information and incorrect assumptions. I know my client looks forward to his testimony."Stone has strongly denied any notion that he or others in the Trump campaign may have colluded with Russia in its interference in the election.“I have had no contacts or collusion with the Russians,” Stone told ABC News chief anchor George Stephanopoulos on “This Week” in March. “There is no collusion, none -- at least none that I know about, in Donald Trump's campaign for president.”Stephanopoulos asked Stone about a tweet he sent on Aug. 21, which read, “Trust me, it will soon be Podesta’s time in the barrel.”Weeks later, Podesta’s emails were hacked and posted to WikiLeaks. U.S. intelligence agencies have concluded that Russia was behind the email hacking of Podesta and other Democrats.“That was your tweet,” Stephanopoulos said to Stone. “And two months later the emails came out.”“Correct,” Stone said. But, he said his tweet made no mention of Podesta’s emails. Stone insisted he was referring to Podesta’s business dealings.“I never made any reference to John Podesta’s email. There were a dozen stories about his business dealings published after that [tweet],” Stone said.
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  • ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- Hillary Clinton's 2016 campaign chairman, John Podesta, went to Capitol Hill on Tuesday for a closed-door hearing with the House Intelligence Committee investigating Russian interference in the election.Speaking to reporters after the hearing, Podesta said he was asked "to come forward to give, to the best of my knowledge, what I knew about [the election interference] and I was happy to cooperate with the committee." He declined to discuss specifics from the session.Podesta, a former chief of staff to President Bill Clinton and counselor to President Barack Obama, was caught up in the cyberattacks that took place at the end of the presidential campaign.His emails were hacked and posted online last fall by WikiLeaks, revealing the inner workings of Clinton's campaign and political operation. The hack led to weeks of unflattering headlines for the campaign ahead of Election Day.Asked about the Obama administration's response to the Russian efforts to influence the election, Podesta said the administration was "dealing with unprecedented weaponization of fruits of Russian cyberactivity.""I think they were trying to make the best judgments they could on behalf of the American people," he said of the Obama team.U.S. intelligence agencies have accused Russia of being behind the hack on Podesta and other hacking during the election.Podesta's comments come as President Trump has increasingly criticized Obama's response to the Russian efforts to influence the election. After the Washington Post reported on the Obama administration's internal deliberations about how to respond evidence of Russia meddling, Trump said in a Fox News interview that Obama "did nothing" about Russia.The Obama administration's response to the Russian meddling has come under some criticism. The administration repeatedly warned Russia against interfering in the election and made resources available to protect state election systems ahead of Election Day in 2016.In December, after the election, Obama issued new sanctions against Russia and ejected alleged Russian operatives from the country.
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  • Alex Wong/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- President Trump suggested that he accepts the Senate health care bill may not come to a vote this week."This will be great if we get it done, and if we don't get it done it's just going to be something that we're not going to like, and that's OK, and I understand that very well," he said while with Republican senators at the White House on Tuesday afternoon.Trump invited the senators to the White House amid problems securing enough support for a procedural vote that would advance the Senate's health care bill."We're going to talk and see what we can do," Trump said. "We're getting very close, but for the country we have to have health care, and it can't be Obamacare which is melting down."Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., announced Tuesday that an earlier plan to hold the procedural vote sometime this week will now be delayed until after the Senate's July 4 recess.
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