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  • Joe Raedle/Getty Images(BIRMINGHAM, Ala.) -- Two days before Alabama's special election, Republican Senate candidate Judge Roy Moore kept a low profile, not holding campaign events or making any public appearances, other than an interview with "The Voice of Alabama Politics."In the interview, Moore again denied the allegations of sexual misconduct against him, and said that he did not know the women who have accused him of sexual assault or molestation."I did not know them. I had no encounter with them. I never molested anyone," Moore said about two of the women who have leveled the most serious accusations against him.Moore, 70, has been accused by eight women of actions ranging from inappropriate behavior to sexual assault when he was in his 30s and, in most of the cases, the women were in their teens. He has denied the allegations."These allegations are completely false," he said. "I did not date underaged women, I did not molest anyone. So these allegations are false.”He blamed the allegations on the "scheme of political parties today.""They know I've stood for moral values and so they're attacking me in that area," he said. "It's done for political purposes."The Republican candidate has not made many public appearances this weekend leading into election day, despite facing a tight race against Democrat Doug Jones.
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  • ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- The only Democratic congresswoman from Alabama said voting for Republican Roy Moore "will only take us backwards.""I really hope that the people of Alabama realize this election is about the soul of this nation and the soul of Alabama," Rep. Terri Sewell told This Week co-anchor Martha Raddatz on Sunday."We who have been proud Alabamians know that we have been trying to overcome our painful past, and this candidate will only take us backwards and harken us back to the days of segregation," Sewell said.The congresswoman is campaigning for Democratic candidate Doug Jones for the special election Tuesday for U.S. Senate.Moore, 70, has been accused by eight women of actions ranging from inappropriate behavior to sexual assault when he was in his 30s and, in most of the cases, when the women were in their teens. Moore has denied the allegations. Sewell said many Republicans in Alabama are focused on winning the seat for their party and are ignoring the allegations against the GOP candidate."At the end of the day, they’re putting party before people, party before principle," she told Raddatz.Sewell added that she believes Alabama voters will "see through this" and vote for Jones."The people of Alabama deserve a senator whose character and integrity and veracity won’t be in question day one in the United States Senate," she said. "When Roy Moore, if he should win, goes to Washington, we will always be questioning his character."
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  • ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- The top Democrat on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee said he agreed with President Donald Trump’s decision to recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital but that the announcement should have been handled with greater diplomacy and as a way to advance the Middle East peace process."We’ve seen this in so many places of the world -- that Mr. Trump has no appreciation for diplomacy," Sen. Ben Cardin, D-Md., said to This Week co-anchor Martha Raddatz on Sunday. "I think the president is damaging our national security and standing in the world for his inability to use diplomacy in the right way."Trump on Tuesday recognized Jerusalem as the capital of Israel and initiated the process of moving the U.S. embassy there from Tel Aviv.Arab leaders in the Middle East and others, including Pope Francis and French President Emmanuel Macron, spoke out against Trump's decision."There was a right way of doing this," Cardin said. "It should have been done in a way to advance the peace process for a two-state solution. Instead, the president just made the announcement and did not take advantage of that, in regards to the Israelis, and offered the Palestinians very little.""He did not really try to move forward on the peace process," the senator said.
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  • ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- With the highly anticipated Alabama special election just days away, a top aide for embattled GOP candidate Roy Moore is confident he'll win and that he won't face a Senate ethics investigation when he gets to Washington."Judge Moore's going to go to Washington, Judge Moore is going to win, and I highly doubt there's going to be a Senate investigation," Roy Moore's chief political strategist, Dean Young, told This Week co-anchor Martha Raddatz on Sunday.If there is a Senate probe, Young said Judge Moore is "going to be found telling the truth, just like he always has, and he will win. The stakes couldn't be higher for Alabama."Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell told reporters last week that he expects Moore will face a Senate ethics probe if he wins.“If he were to be elected, I think he would immediately have an issue with the Ethics Committee, which they would take up,” McConnell said.Young, the Moore strategist, cast the Senate election Tuesday in Alabama as a referendum on President Donald Trump."This is Donald Trump on trial in Alabama," Young said on This Week. "If the people of Alabama vote for this liberal Democrat, Doug Jones, then they’re voting against the president, who they put in office.""It's ground zero for President Donald Trump," Young added. "If they can beat him, they can beat his agenda, because Judge Moore stands with Donald Trump and his agenda."Trump gave a full-throated endorsement of Moore in a rally Friday in Pensacola, Florida, just 20 miles from the Alabama border.Moore, 70, has been accused by eight women of actions ranging from inappropriate behavior to sexual assault when he was in his 30s and, in most of the cases, when the women were in their teens. Moore has denied the allegations.
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  • Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Newly unsealed court documents reveal August 2016 emails between former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort and his former deputy Rick Gates in the days after Manafort left the Trump campaign, discussing a "press strategy" to defend himself after his departure.The emails, attached to a prosecution filing opposing Manafort’s request to alter his bail conditions entered Friday in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, include correspondence between Manafort and Gates from August 21, 2016, two days after Manafort resigned.That email outlines three "main attacks" in the strategy: "1. Cash ledger 2. Fara (redacted) 3. Russia."Manafort and Gates charged in October with, among other charges, making false or misleading statements on Foreign Agents Registration Act (FARA) filings and acting as unregistered agents of a foreign principal (Ukraine).Another email, dated September 5, 2016, from Gates to Manafort, contains a strategy memo titled "Outline of Issues." The document includes a section about "PJM work in Ukraine" with the first points being "1. Never worked in Russia or for Russians," and "2. Work was centered on pro-Ukraine efforts to enter into the EU."The memo also included a section about "PJM work in other countries" and the "need to beat back the idea that this was nefarious work." The memo referred to the work as being "on behalf of the US government" and "in support and promotion of pro-democratic values around the world."Manafort, in an earlier filing, had requested that his restrictive house-arrest conditions be relaxed.The special counsel shot back in a filing last Monday that alleged Manafort defied the court's strict gag order "requiring all interested parties, in particular, counsel for both sides, to refrain from making further statements to the media or in public settings that are substantially likely to have a materially prejudicial effect on this case." Manafort, the government alleged, worked with a Russian associate to draft an op-ed that was published in the Kyiv Post in hopes of influencing public opinion.After Manafort's attorneys replied on Thursday, the government responded late Friday, saying Manafort's conduct "raises serious concerns about this trustworthiness" that warrant denial of his request for a relaxed conditions of release.The court also unsealed a declaration from FBI Special Agent Brock W. Domin, which contained a detailed accounting of Manafort’s revisions to the op-ed, which was published Thursday under the byline of Oleg Voloshin, the former spokesperson of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Ukraine.Prosecutors had filed the declaration and its attachments under seal to prevent the draft op-ed from becoming public, but prosecutors suggested the declaration could be unsealed since the potentially prejudicial material had been made public.The government asked that Manafort’s bail conditions remain unchanged, saying in its opposition papers that Manafort’s conduct undermines trust in his adherence to bail conditions.“Bail is fundamentally about trust -- whether a defendant can be trusted to appear and to abide by the conditions put in place to assure his appearance,” prosecutors wrote in the Friday filing. “Manafort cannot bring himself to state that he had a role in drafting the op-ed, although that fact is established by irrefutable evidence.”Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • ABCNews.com(NEW YORK) -- Roy Moore's campaign is set to run a robocall featuring the voice of President Donald Trump, in what would be Trump's most direct involvement with Moore's campaign efforts to date.Alabama voters will begin receiving calls with the president's endorsement starting Sunday, according to a Moore campaign official."We need Roy voting for us and stopping illegal immigration and crime, rebuilding a stronger military and protecting the Second Amendment and our pro-life values," Trump's voice is heard saying in a version of the robocall played for ABC News. "But if Alabama elects liberal Democrat Doug Jones, all of our progress will be stopped full."Roy Moore is the guy we need to pass our 'Make America Great Again' agenda," Trump adds.The helping hand will come just two days after Trump's campaign rally in Pensacola, Florida, less than 20 miles from the Alabama state border. Trump polled the audience for attendees who crossed the state line to see his rally, and urged voters to "get out and vote for Roy Moore.""The President has recorded a robocall for Roy Moore’s Senate campaign," White House deputy press secretary Raj Shah said in a statement Saturday.A White House official separately confirmed the authenticity of the audio to ABC News.Moore is facing allegations from multiple women of sexual misconduct committed against them decades ago, some of whom claim they were pursued by Moore as teenagers. One of the women alleges he initiated sexual contact when she was 14.Moore has repeatedly denied the allegations and dismissed them as politically motivated attacks.Voters will take to the polls Tuesday in the Alabama special election when Moore faces off against Democratic candidate Doug Jones.
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