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  • State Department photo/ Public Domain(WASHINGTON) -- Secretary of State Rex Tillerson held another round of meetings Tuesday in an effort to end the crisis among its Gulf allies but was met with a continued impasse.As the top U.S. diplomat urges restraint and negotiation, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates say their demands on neighbor Qatar are nonnegotiable.And Qatar, meanwhile, says it is not even reviewing the demands from Saudi Arabia, the UAE and other Arab countries that moved earlier this month to isolate it for its alleged support of terrorism.Tillerson on Tuesday met with the Qatari foreign minister, declining to answer reporters’ shouted questions about stalled talks beforehand. Later in the evening, he met with the Kuwaiti minister of state for cabinet affairs.Kuwait, with the support of the U.S., is trying to mediate the dispute between Qatar on one side and Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain and Egypt on the other.Before the meeting with the Kuwaiti official, Tillerson told reporters, “We hope all the parties will continue to talk to one another in good faith.”Afterward, Tillerson’s spokesperson Heather Nauert released a statement saying the secretary and Sheikh Mohammad Abdullah Al-Sabah of Kuwait “reaffirmed the need for all parties to exercise restraint to allow for productive diplomatic discussions. The secretary urged the parties to remain open to negotiation as the best way to resolve the dispute.”But just hours earlier, Saudi Foreign Minister Adel al Jubeir told reporters that none of the 10 items on his group's list of demands are negotiable and that Qatar must meet them all.They include: shutting down Qatar’s multinational news network, Al Jazeera; cutting back ties with Iran; ending support for the Muslim Brotherhood, Hamas, and other Islamist groups; and closing a Turkish military base.“We stay where we are. We’ve made our point, we’ve taken our positions. If Qatar wants to come back into the [Gulf Cooperation Council] pool, they know what they have to do,” Jubeir said.“If they don’t, they will remain isolated. We don’t have to deal with them… We don’t have to deal with a country that has done harm to us, unless they change their behavior,” he added.To Saudi officials, Qatar's fulfilling their demands could mean meeting the spirit of some of them, without accomplishing each item itself. But either way, that hard line and willingness to leave Qatar -- a key U.S. ally that hosts nearly 10,000 troops supporting the fight against ISIS -- out in the cold is at odds with the U.S. view.On the other side, the Qatari foreign minister told the Al Hurra news outlet that it will not respond until the Saudis and others provide evidence for their accusations. He told Al Jazeera “the demands must be realistic and enforceable and otherwise are unacceptable.”All of this leaves the U.S. in a difficult spot -- torn between crucial allies who are no closer to an agreement despite weeks of public pressure, and some mixed messages, from the administration.Going forward, the U.S. won’t weigh in on which demands Qatar should meet and which are unrealistic, but wants the two sides to figure that out, Nauert said at the briefing Tuesday.“I don’t know that that’s for the State Department to weigh in at that level, because ultimately, these parties have to live with the decisions and the agreements that they make,” she said.Al Jubeir denied that the timing of the crisis was tied to President Trump, after speculation that the Saudis and their allies felt emboldened to take action after the president’s visit to the Kingdom. And he wouldn’t say if there were talks to move the enormous U.S. air base in Qatar to the UAE or Saudi Arabia, saying that was an American decision.
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  • Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Former Trump campaign Chairman Paul Manafort has registered as a foreign agent for past work on behalf of Ukraine, a spokesperson announced Tuesday.Manafort registered with the Department of Justice's Foreign Agents Registration Act unit for his work on behalf of a political party in Ukraine, his spokesperson, Jason Maloni, said in a statement."Today, Paul Manafort registered with the Department of Justice's [Foreign Agents Registration] unit for his work on behalf of Ukraine's Party of Regions. He started this process in concert with FARA's unit in September, before the outcome of the election and well before any formal investigation of election interference began," Maloni said Tuesday."Paul's primary focus was always directed at domestic Ukrainian political campaign work, and that is reflected in [Tuesday's] filing. Paul has appreciated the professionalism and guidance of the FARA unit throughout this process."Manafort's past work with Ukraine has haunted him in the last several months as he is among the people whose activities are under scrutiny as part of the House and Senate investigations into Russia's interference in the U.S. election in 2016 and possible ties to Trump associates.Manafort was named campaign convention manager for Trump in March 2016. He was promoted to campaign chairman and chief strategist in May 2016 and resigned in August, after the New York Times reported that his name appeared on a list of so-called black ledger accounts made by the toppled Ukrainian president with amounts up to $12.7 million from 2007 to 2012
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(MOSCOW) -- A massive cyberattack that freezes computers and demands a ransom to open them has hit companies in the U.S. and elsewhere around the world, U.S. officials and private cybersecurity analysts said Tuesday.Among the American targets are the giant Merck pharmaceutical company in New Jersey; a major multinational law firm, DLA Piper; and possibly the Mondelez food company, which produces Oreo cookies.According to American cybersecurity researchers, the ransomware attack used a global spam campaign to trick computer users into downloading malicious software that locks them out of their devices until they pay $300 in Bitcoin. The email address where victims can confirm payment is not working, however, making recovery impossible.Researchers tell ABC News that tens of thousands of computers across multiple large organizations in at least four continents have been hit, with organizations in Russia and the Ukraine the most affected.While several researchers identified the virus as a derivative of the “Petya” ransomware, Kaspersky Lab, which congressional sources told ABC News is itself under FBI scrutiny, disputed that assessment, concluding that the virus was “a new ransomware that has not been seen before” and dubbing it “NotPetya.”Like the WannaCry attack in May, Tuesday’s ransomware appears to be using the hacking tools EternalBlue and DoublePulsar developed by the U.S. National Security Agency and leaked to the public by The Shadow Brokers hacker group. The virus exploits a vulnerability in Microsoft Windows to spread quickly throughout networks with outdated security software."Many researchers are seeing evidence that the NSA exploits are being used to propagate this," John Bambenek of Fidelis Cybersecurity told ABC News. "Some ineffective security defenses allowed this to happen as well."On Tuesday afternoon, Amit Serper, a researcher at the Boston-based cybersecurity firm Cybereason, tweeted that he had found a way to stop the malware using the virus’ original file name, though he cautioned it was not a “generic kill switch” like the one discovered to stop WannaCry, but only a “temporary workaround.”Early reports indicated the virus affected major companies in Russia and Ukraine as well as the world’s largest shipping firm, Maersk, according to the affected companies and government sources.Ukraine appears to have been particularly hard hit, with the country’s government reporting that some of its systems, as well as those of key institutions, including banks and telecom providers, were affected. Even radiation monitoring at the Chernobyl nuclear power station was impacted, with technicians forced to take measurements around the ruined station manually after their Windows computers were knocked out, Ukraine’s government said.Merck confirmed on Twitter that its network was infected."We confirm our company's computer network was compromised today as part of global hack," the company tweeted. "Other organizations have also been affected. We are investigating the matter and will provide additional information as we learn more."A spokesperson for DLA Piper, a global law firm with offices in Washington, D.C., confirmed that malware spread to its system, saying, “The firm, like many other reported companies, has experienced issues with some of its systems due to suspected malware. We are taking steps to remedy the issue as quickly as possible.”Mondelez International, a New Jersey–based food and drink company, released a statement saying its networks were down."The Mondelez International network is experiencing a global IT outage. Our global special situations management team is in place, and they are working to resolve the situation as quickly as possible. We will update as we have more information.”Both the Department of Homeland Security and the FBI issued statements indicating that officials w
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  • James Devaney/WireImage(LONDON) -- The Queen is getting a raise.
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  • Chris Graythen/Getty Images(RIO DE JANEIRO) -- Brazilian President Michel Temer has called a bribery charge filed against him, "fiction."
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- In allowing President Trump’s revised travel ban to partially take effect, the Supreme Court left key questions unanswered and likely opened the floodgates for additional litigation.In a six-justice “per curiam” opinion, the high court ruled Monday that the administration could block entry of nationals from six Muslim-majority countries for 90 days and all refugees for 120 days with exceptions for foreign nationals who have a “credible claim of a bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States.”But what is a “bona fide relationship?”The test appears to be new and unprecedented in the context of immigration, legal experts told ABC News.Heather Nauert, a State Department spokesperson, said in a press briefing Tuesday that lawyers for the Justice Department are in the process of determining what qualifies as a bona fide relationship.“We don’t have a definition here at the State Department for that yet. None of the agencies has that definition just yet,” Nauert said. Once they have that definition and some guidance, they will share it with consular officers who review visa applications, she said, and may post it publicly online for visa applicants to see.The court’s ruling provided some guidance on who should be granted entry to the U.S. under the “bona fide relationship” test: foreign nationals with family members in the U.S., students admitted to American universities, workers with U.S. job offers, and lecturers invited to address an American audience. But, the justices wrote, “not so someone who enters into a relationship simply to avoid” the travel ban.Still, Daniel Pierce, an immigration lawyer at Fragomen, Del Rey, Bernsen and Loewy, LLP, still wondered: “Is a potential student coming to visit U.S. colleges covered by the ban? Is a cousin or a brother sufficiently 'close' for familial purposes? Does it matter when someone was invited to address a U.S. audience, i.e. before or after the travel ban or the court’s opinion?”“I suspect there are numerous agency lawyers poring over this opinion with an eye on how to answer these very tricky questions,” Pierce added.John Cohen, a former Department of Homeland Security official and an ABC News contributor said, "It is unclear to me who the ban would apply to, aside from someone who knows no one in the U.S. and is coming here on vacation.”“Even in the case of tourism -- if i am coming to visit friends or family -- that could be allowable under the Supreme Court’s language,” Cohen said. Tourist visas from the six countries are already rare, said experts, especially because three of them, Iran, Libya and Somalia, do not even have US embassies. The other three countries covered by the travel ban are Yemen, Syria and Sudan.Three Supreme Court justices – Clarence Thomas, Samuel Alito and Neil Gorsuch – broke with the court’s majority on Monday to warn that the “bona fide relationship” test will be “unworkable.” Arguing that the travel ban should go into effect in full, the justices wrote that this “compromise” “will invite a flood of litigation” over who has “sufficient connections” to the U.S. and will burden administration officials who could face contempt of court if they get it wrong.Among those likely to take legal action are refugee support networks, like the International Refugee Assistance Project, which is already a party to the Supreme Court's case. Betsy Fisher, the group’s political director, told ABC News that under their organization's interpretation, “This will apply fairly narrowly.""There are many groups of refugees who already have close ties to the U.S.,” including those who have family members recently granted refugee status or asylum, Iraqis and Afghans who worked for the U.S. gov
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