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  • iStock/Thinkstock(PARIS) -- Far-right populist Marine Le Pen and centrist Emmanuel Macron claimed victory in Sunday's first-round vote in the French presidential election.Besting nine other candidates, the two will now face off in a second and final round on May 7.Celebrating his advancement, Macron addressed supporters in Paris, in a speech that called for unity and reiterated his support for the European Union."The deep seated feeling, age old feeling that has always pushed our people forward, the commitment to our country, the collective interest over division, this is what has won tonight," he said as a sea of supporters waved French flags. "This election has opened the door to optimism, to a new path to hope for Europe for the world."With his words, he drew a sharp contrast with his opponent, who has floated the idea of referendum -- dubbed "Frexit" -- on whether to leave or remain in the E.U.Favored to win the second-round, Macron -- a 39-year-old former government minister who has never held elected office -- was quick to cast himself as a political outsider, saying, "I have heard your expectations, for true change, for true democracy," and urged his voters to "start writing a whole new page in the political history of our country."Le Pen, who appears to have come in second place, according to exit polls, said that the victory was an "honor" that she received "with humility and gratitude.""From now on I have an immense responsibility of defending the French nation, its unity, its culture and its independence," she said. "The French must take advantage of this historical opportunity offered to them, because what is at stake here is the wild type of globalization endangering our civilization.""The survival of France," was at stake in the second-round vote, she said.She took shots at the European Union and sitting President François Hollande during her speech, before concluding and leading her supporters in singing the French national anthem.Reports suggested that protesters in Paris have clashed with police in demonstrations against Le Pen's victory.Sunday's result marked the first time that no major-party candidate would contest the second-round vote."This is still an anti-establishment outcome, even though Macron represents a centrist platform," Erik Brattberg, director of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace's Europe Program, told ABC News. "Worth watching now is whether other French politicians will be rallying around Macron to defeat Le Pen in second round."François Fillon, the conservative candidate who appears to have come in third place, conceded defeat, saying: "There is no other choice than to vote against the extreme right. Therefore I am voting for Emmanuel Macron."French voters were going to the polls for a first-round vote to choose their next president from among 11 candidates, including Le Pen, who opposes immigration and has voiced skepticism about France's membership in the European Union.Pre-election polls suggested Le Pen and Macron, an independent centrist and former economy minister, were in the lead."Le Pen did as expected. There was no hidden Le Pen vote in the first round. While she can get more votes in a second round with only one opponent, she has likely reached a ceiling among her core voters," Brattberg predicted.Leading up to the vote, Fillon, a former prime minister embroiled in a scandal over alleged fake jobs given to his wife and children, appeared to be closing the gap in recent days, as was far-left candidate Jean-Luc Melenchon."A last-minute push by Fillon and far-left candidate Jean-Luc Mélenchon was not enough to get them into the run-off," Philip Crowther, a correspondent for France 24 in Washington, told ABC News. "This result is a disaster for France's main two parties -- the conservative Republican party and the Socialist party."The election is seen as a litmus test for the future of the European Union and the spread of populism around the world.Mo
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(PARIS) -- Centrist Emmanuel Macron and far-right populist Marine Le Pen appear to have won the first round of France’s presidential election.They now advance to a second round vote that will held on May 7.And the choice for France could be one of the most consequential in decades, analysts say.At stake, analysts say, is nothing short of the direction of Europe and the European Union, with the two candidates offering starkly different visions for the future of France and its role on the world stage.Here's a look at the two candidates who will almost certainly be on the ballot.Le Pen: The Donald Trump of France?Le Pen leads France's far-right Front National (FN) party, and was seen as a front-runner during the lead-up to the first round vote.She has been propelled by similar political forces that saw the British vote to "Brexit" -– or leave the European Union -– and Donald Trump win the U.S. presidency this November.Trump hinted before the first-round vote that he favored her candidacy over the others.Ethnic and religious tensions have been stoked by repeated terror attacks. Unemployment has been stuck at around 10 percent for nearly five years. France's economic growth was meek in 2016 -– estimates put it just above 1 percent. These factors are driving frustration and anger in large parts of the country.She has taken a strong stance against illegal immigration and championed anti-globalist sentiments. Le Pen has also proposed a referendum on France's membership in the E.U. Many have dubbed the hypothetical vote "Frexit."Analysts have said that Le Pen being elected would pose an existential threat to the European Union –- the bloc of European democratic states that grouped together after World War II with the aim of preventing future strife."A Len Pen win would call into question the future of the entire European project," Erik Brattberg, director of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace's Europe Program, told ABC News. "Her anti-EU, anti-immigration and anti-globalization stance would put her starkly at odds with whoever is elected the next chancellor of Germany, France's most important partner in Europe."It could also be damaging to U.S. interests, Brattberg said: "Le Pen would seek to reorient French foreign policy away from the U.S. and NATO and towards Putin's Russia."An anti-establish candidate but not an outsider, Le Pen comes from a family that has enjoyed the political spotlight for decades –- if not very successfully. Her father ran for the presidency five times.The elder Le Pen led the Front National party before his daughter and his reputation continues to haunt her candidacy. He was widely rebuked for calling Nazi concentration camps "a detail of history." Marine Le Pen has denounced these remarks.Even if she doesn't pull off a victory in two weeks time, Le Pen "would be well positioned to make another run next time around," Brattberg said.Macron: France's own Justin Trudeau?French voters have another choice: centrist and political newcomer Emmanuel Macron, a 39-year-old political neophyte who has been likened by some to Justin Trudeau of Canada..Macron was the country's economy minister up until he quit in 2016 -- the same year he formed the En Marche! party. He has never held an elected office.Unlike Le Pen, Macron is pro-Europe and made that clear in his victory speech after the first round vote."Macron would pursue a centrist approach, working closely with Germany to reform the Eurozone and the EU," Brattberg said.His political platform earned him the tacit support of former President Obama, who called Macron to wish him well ahead of the first round vote. Obama's spokesman was quick to note that this was not a formal endorsement; however, the two are seen as political allies.Populism remains ... popularHeading into the second round of voting Macron is seen as the favorite to win. But similar predictions were made ahead of the Brexit vote and U.S. el
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- A U.S. citizen and academic was detained in North Korea while trying to leave the country with his wife on Saturday, a spokesperson for the university that employed him has confirmed.Tony Kim, 58, who goes by his Korean name-- Kim Sang-duk-- was detained while trying to board a flight to China from Pyongyang's international airport, according to Colin McCulloch, director of external relations at Pyongyang University of Science and Technology (PUST), where Kim taught accounting.The university's executive leadership released a statement Sunday saying that it "has learned that Mr Sang Duk (Tony) Kim was detained" by North Korean authorities as he was about to leave the country, "after several weeks of service, teaching at PUST."We understand that this detention is related to an investigation into matters that are not connected in any way with the work of PUST."At least two other American citizens are currently being held by North Korea -- Otto Warmbier, a a 21-year-old student at University of Virginia, and Kim Dong Chul.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- While it's no secret that the ice on Earth's poles is melting, scientists are still learning about how rapidly these changes are happening.Now a new study of water across the surface of Antarctica finds that the melting is occurring to a greater degree than previously thought.“This study tells us there’s already a lot more melting going on than we thought,” co-author Robin Bell told Columbia University's Earth Institute last week in a press release about the study. “When you turn up the temperature, it’s only going to increase.”Researchers from Columbia’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory conducted the study and published their findings in the journal Nature on Wednesday. The scientists "found extensive drainages of meltwater" flowing in parts of Antarctica where they did not expect to find it, according to the Earth Institute's press release.Video provided by the Earth Institute, shows a 400-foot-wide waterfall draining a steady flow of turquoise water off the Nansen ice shelf and into the ocean.  The Nansen ice shelf, which is on the southern side of the continent, is a mammoth glacier that stretches about 30 miles long and 10 miles wide, according to Geographic Names and Information Systems.“This is not in the future — this is widespread now and has been for decades,” glaciologist Jonathan Kingslake told the Earth Institute. “I think most polar scientists have considered water moving across the surface of Antarctica to be extremely rare. But we found a lot of it, over very large areas.”In January, scientists warned that a chunk of ice about the size of Delaware could soon break off the Larsen C ice shelf in northern Antarctica.When the Delaware-sized chunk of ice breaks away, the Larsen C ice shelf could lose more than 10 percent of its area, according to Project MIDAS, a U.K.-based Antarctic research project.The "event will fundamentally change the landscape of the Antarctic Peninsula," Project MIDAS said. Overwinterer at the Neumayer Station also support the #MarchForScience – our message of support from Antarctica! @ScienceMarchDC pic.twitter.com/7qObD39aY4
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(LONDON) -- Prince William, Princess Kate, and Prince Harry put their hands together to push the red button that started the London Marathon. The royal trio, who founded a charity that aims to break the stigma surrounding mental health, were on hand to support the runners at the starting line Sunday morning. It's #LondonMarathon day!Whichever amazing cause you're running for, let's make this the #MentalHealth Marathon! #TeamHeadsTogether pic.twitter.com/sT3RxUa4Pa
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  • ABC News(SYDNEY) -- Vice President Mike Pence took a brief break from being a statesman on Sunday, instead opting to be a tourist on his last full day in Australia.And like any camera-toting tourist in a foreign land, he was quick to share photos of his excursions on social media.  Pence, along with his wife Karen and their daughters Audrey and Charlotte, kicked off the day with a guided visit of Sydney's Taronga Zoo.The Pences spent over an hour at the zoo, where they got up close and personal with an emu, an echidna, an owl, a possum -- and, being Australia, a kangaroo named Penny and a koala named Bai'yali."Couldn't visit Australia without seeing the kangaroos," the vice president tweeted. "Karen, Charlotte, Audrey and I enjoying our morning visit to @tarongazoo. #VPinAUS."The second lady fed an emu named Widji leaves, while the vice president and Audrey petted him.The vice president said, laughing, "Should we [take a] selfie?" But the emu didn't appear interested, and began walking away. Pence concluded, "Looks like he's done!"Audrey, though, did manage to snap a selfie with a kangaroo. "I was obsessed with kangaroos as a kid," she said. Thanks @tarongazoo for a fun and informative visit. #VPinAUS pic.twitter.com/Af2dhxn8cs
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