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  • Wavebreak Media/Thinkstock(MANCHESTER, England) — Three arrests have been made in connection with Monday's deadly explosion in Manchester that killed 22 people and injured more than 50 others at one of Europe's largest and most well-known arenas, U.K. authorities said Wednesday.The suspects were apprehended in south Manchester early Wednesday morning, according to the Greater Manchester Police.Police previously announced that they had arrested a 23-year-old man on Tuesday in connection with the attack, which ISIS has claimed responsibility for.The arrests announcement came a day after Prime Minister Theresa May increased the country's threat level to critical -- the highest of the U.K.'s five threat levels -- indicating that another attack could be imminent.Monday's explosion, which occurred in the Manchester Arena's foyer after an Ariana Grande concert ended, killed 22 people and injured 64 others. Several children were seriously injured in the attack, and an eight-year old child was among the dead.Authorities on Tuesday identified Salman Abedi, 22, as the suspected suicide bomber behind the fatal explosion, but they are still trying to determine if he acted as a part of a group.
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  • ABCNews.com(MANCHESTER, England) -- U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May said Tuesday the threat level in the region has been raised from severe to critical following Monday's attack in Manchester.Critical is the highest of the five threat levels. Soldiers will now be deployed at public events and police officers responsible for guarding key sites will be replaced by armed military officers. Military officers may also be deployed at key events.The change indicates that another attack may be imminent.May said the U.K. could not ignore the possibility that more individuals are linked to the Manchester Arena attack.The man suspected of carrying out the explosion at an Ariana Grande concert was identified as 22-year-old Salman Abedi, police said Tuesday. At least 22 people died and more than 50 were injured in the blast.Abedi died at the scene after using an improvised explosive device, officials said. Police are still trying to determine if he acted alone or was part of a group.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(MANCHESTER, England) -- The frantic search for clues about Salman Abedi, the suspected Manchester Arena bomber, and his possible connections to ISIS is underway.Police say they conducted a pair of raids on Tuesday, one in the Whalley Range neighborhood, in which they scoured the suspect’s home, the other in nearby Fallowfield, which police said included a “controlled explosion to enable safe entry.” Authorities also took one man, identified by neighbors as the bomber’s older brother, into custody outside a local grocery store.The portrait emerging of the alleged bomber, who is believed to have detonated an improvised explosive device that killed him and 22 people and injured more than 50 others outside an Ariana Grande concert on Monday night, is one of a potentially disaffected young man who grew up in an area identified as a hotbed for jihadi recruitment.Abedi, 22, was described as the son of a family who emigrated from Libya and, according to Robin Simcox, a terrorism and national security analyst at The Heritage Foundation, one of the hundreds of young men known to British counterterrorism authorities as potential threat.“Abedi was a terrorist suspect in the UK, MI5 were aware of him,” Simcox told ABC News. “They were aware that he posed a potential threat but they didn’t think he posed an imminent threat that he proved himself to do in Manchester.”A photo of Abedi was first published on the front page of the British newspaper The Sun.In recent years, Abedi took business classes at the University of Salford in Manchester, where he registered for classes this year, a university spokesperson told ABC News, but hasn’t attended any classes and was not well-known socially.A senior counterterrorism official told ABC that one reason Abedi may have dropped out of college is because he recently travelled outside the United Kingdom to Libya and possibly other countries, "it seems, to get some skills,” though Syria did not appear to be one of his destinations.Abedi, the official said, was on the radar of British security officials but time ran out on the surveillance clock without Abedi doing anything nefarious, so authorities apparently moved on. It is unknown, the official added, whether Abedi made the device on his own or if he had help.Mohammed Saeed, the imam of the local Didsbury Mosque and Islamic Centre, where Abedi sometimes worshipped, told ABC News that Abedi became angry with him after he gave a sermon in 2015 in which he criticized ISIS."He was showing me hate, he hated me basically," Saeed said. "I was shocked, shocked and angry. All innocent lives matter.”The neighborhood, around an area called Moss Side, just a few miles from the concert hall, is considered by police to be a hot bed of ISIS recruitment, according to Dr. Alexander Meleagrou-Hitchens, the research director of the program on extremism at The George Washington University.“Moss Side is very well known,” Hitchens told ABC News. “A lot of people with petty criminal pasts, involvement in gangs, getting involved instead with ISIS later on.”According to Matt Olsen, the former director of the National Counterterrorism Center and an ABC News contributor, the most pressing questions have yet to be answered.“The investigators need to focus and are focused on who else may be involved, where did this individual learn to build a device like this, to carry out an attack like this,” Olsen said. “The real question is, is there a cell that goes beyond this individual.”
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  • Franco Origlia/Getty Images(VATICAN CITY) -- After a history of public disagreements on issues from the border wall to climate change to what it means to be Christian, President Donald Trump and Pope Francis will meet for the first time in person Wednesday morning, at the Vatican.The public back-and-forth began during the presidential campaign when Pope Francis alluded to Trump in an interview, saying a man who builds walls instead of bridges isn't a man of faith."A person who thinks only about building walls, wherever they may be, and not of building bridges, is not Christian," the pontiff said on Feb. 18 aboard the papal plane."This is not the gospel. As far as what you said about whether I would advise to vote or not to vote," Pope Francis said. "I am not going to get involved in that. I say only that this man is not Christian if he has said things like that. We must see if he said things in that way and I will give him the benefit of the doubt."Trump, who was leading the Republican primary race at the time, responded by saying the pope might regret his statements."If and when the Vatican is attacked by ISIS, which as everyone knows is ISIS' ultimate trophy, I can promise you that the pope would have only wished and prayed that Donald Trump would have been president," Trump said during an appearance in South Carolina that same day.Trump went on to argue that the Mexican government was "using the Pope as a pawn" and wrongfully feeding him information."That's the Mexican government," he said. "They should be ashamed of themselves for doing so, especially when so many lives are involved and when illegal immigration is so rampant and so dangerous and so bad for the United States.”Trump then said he "likes" the pope, but considered his comments "disgraceful.""For a religious leader to question a person’s faith is disgraceful," Trump said in a statement released the same day. “I am proud to be a Christian and as President I will not allow Christianity to be consistently attacked and weakened, unlike what is happening now, with our current President. No leader, especially a religious leader, should have the right to question another man’s religion or faith.”The two men started softening their public stances in the lead up to this visit. After it was announced that Trump would be paying the Catholic leader a visit, Pope Francis acknowledged that they may not see eye to eye.When asked about what he expects from his meeting with Trump, given that they have very different views on immigration and climate change, the pontiff replied that he doesn't want to prejudge the president before he has met with him."I will tell him what I think, he will tell me what he thinks, but I never wanted to judge someone before I listen to the person first," the pope said aboard the papal plane on May 13.The two leaders differ greatly in their views on immigration and climate change. Trump has said he wants to withdraw from the Paris climate agreement and has declared climate change to be a "hoax." Pope Francis has written an encyclical, or papal letter, on the environment, in which he calls for global action to combat climate change.The pope said he won't try to persuade Trump to embrace his views. "I am not a proselytiser," he said.When asked if he hopes Trump will soften his stance after their meeting, the pope said it's a "political calculus" he cannot afford.Instead, the Catholic leader said he would be honest and open with Trump and expects to talk about "common things.""There are always doors that are not completely shut," Pope Francis said. "We need to find the doors that are at least slightly open."He added that people should say what they think, but "with respect."For his part, Trump has kept an optimistic tone about the visit.At an April 20 news conference, Trump said "I look very much forward to meeting the pope."During his commencement speech at the Coast Guard Academy, Trump said that he will "talk with Pope Fr
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  • Dave Thompson/Getty Images(MANCHESTER, England) -- ISIS has claimed responsibility for an explosion Monday at an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England, that killed 22 people and injured 59 others.In a statement translated from Arabic, ISIS said that a "soldier of the caliphate" placed explosives at a gathering of "crusaders" -- meaning Christians -- at the Manchester Arena. The statement said about 30 people were killed and about 70 more were wounded.The man believed to be the lone attacker died at the scene after using an improvised explosive device, officials said, but police are still trying to determine if he acted alone or was part of a group, said U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May.Authorities in the United Kingdom have preliminarily identified the bomber as 23-year-old Salman Abedi, sources familiar with the probe said.The explosion is being treated as a terrorist attack, and May said the threat level remains at severe, meaning the government considers another attack highly likely. The severe level is the second highest of five, with critical the highest.Greater Manchester Police said a 23-year-old man was arrested in South Manchester in connection with the attack.Police also said authorities executed two warrants as a part of the investigation: one in the Whalley Range district of Manchester and one in the Manchester suburb of Fallowfield, where a controlled explosion took place.Greater Manchester Police said officers were called to the Manchester Arena just before 10:35 p.m. local time on Monday. The explosion happened near the arena's foyer after the concert, according to witnesses, who reported hearing a bang as they exited.The venue holds about 21,000 people and is one of Europe's largest indoor arenas, according to its website. The arena is connected to the Manchester Victoria Station, the city's second-largest train station.An 8-year-old girl named Saffie Rose Roussos is among those killed.Twelve children under the age of 16 were seriously injured, officials said."We struggle to comprehend the warped and twisted mind that sees a room packed with young children not as a scene to cherish but as an opportunity for carnage," May said Tuesday.Greater Manchester Police are requesting dashcam footage from "anyone who was in Manchester city centre" between 8 p.m. and 11 p.m. Monday night as part of their investigation.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(LONDON) -- The deadly suicide bombing in Manchester, England, that killed 22 people and injured 59 others at an Ariana Grande concert Monday night is one of several terror attacks that have taken place in the U.K. in recent years.The British people have endured politically-motivated attacks, attacks by right-wing extremists and attacks by Islamic extremists over the last few decades.April 1999: David Copeland bombingsDavid Copeland was convicted in 2000 of killing three people and injuring 139 others after perpetrating a series of nail-bombing attacks that took place across the month of April 1999, according to reports by BBC News.He was given six life sentences for his crimes.Copeland, who belonged to far right-wing fascist groups according to a report in The Independent, targeted black, South Asian and gay Londoners in his plot.July 7, 2005: London Underground attackFour suicide bombers armed with "rucksacks full of explosives" attacked civilians traveling on London Underground trains as well as a double-decker bus on the morning of July 7, 2005. More than 50 people were killed and hundreds of others were injured, according to a report by BBC News.Mohammad Sidique Khan, 30, Shehzad Tanweer, 22, Hasib Hussain, 18, and Germaine Lindsay, 19, carried out the attacks, according to the BBC.The attackers were motivated by Islamic extremism, and Khan recorded a video prior to carrying out the attacks in which he praised al-Qaeda founder Osama bin Laden.May 22, 2013: Murder of Lee RigbyTwo Islamic extremists savagely murdered Lee Rigby, a British soldier and veteran of the Afghanistan War, just outside an army barrack, telling eyewitnesses the killing was "as an eye for an eye ... because Muslims are dying by British soldiers every day," according to ABC News reporting from that time.The killers, Michael Adebolajo and Michael Adebowale, first ran over Rigby in a car then dragged him into the middle of the street in the South London neighborhood of Woolwich.There, they hacked him to death with large knives, according to eyewitnesses.Adebolajo and Adebowale were sentenced to life in prison in December of 2013, according to a report by BBC News.Dec. 5, 2015: Leytonstone knife attackShortly after the Paris attacks in November of 2015, a 29-year-old man, Muhaydin Mire, was restrained and arrested for attempted murder after trying to stab people in the Leytonstone metro station with a knife.The attack left a 56-year-old man in the hospital with serious but not life-threatening knife injuries, and a second man suffered minor injuries but did not require medical assistance, police said, according to an ABC News report at the time.Mire, a former Uber driver with a history of mental health issues, had an interest in the terror group ISIS, according to a report in The Standard.He pleaded guilty to attempted murder in 2016.June 16, 2016: Assassination of Jo CoxJo Cox, a British member of Parliament, was killed in broad daylight after a town hall meeting at a library in West Yorkshire, England, one week prior to the Brexit referendum, according to ABC News' reporting from last summer.Her killer, Thomas Mair, was a longtime supporter of a U.S.-based neo-Nazi organization, according to a watchdog group that tracks extremists. The Guardian reported that he had an interest in Nazism.Mair is serving a life sentence for the crime.March 22, 2017: Westminster Bridge attackThree people were killed, including a police officer, and at least 29 people were hospitalized following an attack in London that took place earlier this year.The attack began when a driver struck pedestrians and three police officers on Westminster Bridge, London's Metropolitan Police said.Richard Tice, a witness, told ABC News that he saw injured people lined up along the pavement. According to Tice, the car jumped the curb, knocking over pedestrians.The car then crashed into the fence around the Houses of Parliament, and a man armed with a knife attacked an officer
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